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15h
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou Just realised that Euler's constant is the exponent - stupid of me :(. I mixed things up, Euler's constant should be written in italics, the electron charge (as a unit) using Roman face...
16h
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou It actually does seem to be a standard: ISO/IEC 80000 - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_80000.
16h
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou I guess it is not much of a standard if not many people know of it ;-) Although I would note that for instance LaTeX doe try to conform to the standard when using functions as when using $\log$ (\log) instead of $log$ (log).
16h
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou No, the exponent ($\exp$) should be written in roman form, not Euler's constant. The fundamental charge is often used as a unit. Maybe the word 'standard' was not the correct word. The conventions are from the International System of Units and can for instance be found at physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/checklist.html
16h
answered Declination and Ascension - the Sun and Andromeda
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revised Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
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comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou, The correct form of the wavefunction should be: $\psi(r) = \frac{m^{3/2}e^3}{\pi^{1/2}\hbar^3}\textrm{e}^{-me^2r/\hbar^2}$. Please note the fact that the exponent is written in non-italic form, while Euler's constant is italic. Physical quantities (and constants) should be printed in italics while units and math constants should be printed 'straight'. So there should not be any ambiguity here if the author conforms to the standards.
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revised Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
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revised Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
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answered Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
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comment What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
@User58220 Yes thank you, I've edited the answer accordingly.
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revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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answered What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
Oct
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revised Diameter of any galaxy
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Oct
19
comment Diameter of any galaxy
You're right, it depends on the user's perspective. I guess foreshortening might be an issue for irregular galaxies although I'm not sure how this is related to the equation in the question?
Oct
19
answered Diameter of any galaxy