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seen Dec 17 at 7:45

Nov
9
comment Number density of stars on the Galactic plane
I meant $N(0)$ of course.
Nov
9
comment Number density of stars on the Galactic plane
@barrycarter I got it from a course on the Milky Way I did a few years back, it's not available online. Thanks for the link, I should have realised that the values for $N(z)$ depend on the radial distance from the Milky Way's core as your reference mentions.
Nov
8
awarded  Student
Nov
8
asked Number density of stars on the Galactic plane
Nov
4
revised Which stars did the Sun form with?
added 507 characters in body
Nov
4
answered Which stars did the Sun form with?
Oct
24
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou Just realised that Euler's constant is the exponent - stupid of me :(. I mixed things up, Euler's constant should be written in italics, the electron charge (as a unit) using Roman face...
Oct
24
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou It actually does seem to be a standard: ISO/IEC 80000 - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_80000.
Oct
24
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou I guess it is not much of a standard if not many people know of it ;-) Although I would note that for instance LaTeX doe try to conform to the standard when using functions as when using $\log$ (\log) instead of $log$ (log).
Oct
24
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou No, the exponent ($\exp$) should be written in roman form, not Euler's constant. The fundamental charge is often used as a unit. Maybe the word 'standard' was not the correct word. The conventions are from the International System of Units and can for instance be found at physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/checklist.html
Oct
24
answered Declination and Ascension - the Sun and Andromeda
Oct
24
revised Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
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Oct
24
comment Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
@StanLiou, The correct form of the wavefunction should be: $\psi(r) = \frac{m^{3/2}e^3}{\pi^{1/2}\hbar^3}\textrm{e}^{-me^2r/\hbar^2}$. Please note the fact that the exponent is written in non-italic form, while Euler's constant is italic. Physical quantities (and constants) should be printed in italics while units and math constants should be printed 'straight'. So there should not be any ambiguity here if the author conforms to the standards.
Oct
24
revised Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
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Oct
24
revised Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
added 248 characters in body
Oct
24
answered Is there a standard mapping of symbols to terms for celestial and orbital mechanics
Oct
23
comment What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
@User58220 Yes thank you, I've edited the answer accordingly.
Oct
23
revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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Oct
21
revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
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Oct
21
revised What is the angular diameter of Earth as seen from the Moon?
added 231 characters in body