6 Added missing link and expanded on explanation of radiation types.
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3cm is 10 GHz and can be received with a 10 GHz receiver. The difference between synchrotron and free-free is explained on NRAO's webpagewebpages Free–Free Radiation and Synchrotron Radiation.

Acceleration by a magnetic field produces magnetobremsstrahlung, the German word for “magnetic braking radiation.” The character of magnetobremsstrahlung depends on the speeds of the electrons, so these somewhat different types of radiation are given specific names. Gyro radiation comes from electrons whose velocities are much smaller than the speed of light: $v≪c$. Mildly relativistic electrons whose kinetic energies are comparable with their rest mass $m_e⁢c^2$ emit cyclotron radiation, and ultrarelativistic electrons (kinetic energies $≫m_e⁢c^2$) produce synchrotron radiation.

Acceleration by an electric field accounts for free–free radiation, the resulting emission is called free–free radiation because the electron is free both before and after the interaction; it is not captured by the ion. If the ionized interstellar cloud is reasonably dense, the electrons and ions interact often enough that they quickly come into local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at some common temperature, so free–free radiation is usually thermal emission.

3cm is 10 GHz and can be received with a 10 GHz receiver. The difference between synchrotron and free-free is explained on NRAO's webpage Synchrotron Radiation.

3cm is 10 GHz and can be received with a 10 GHz receiver. The difference between synchrotron and free-free is explained on NRAO's webpages Free–Free Radiation and Synchrotron Radiation.

Acceleration by a magnetic field produces magnetobremsstrahlung, the German word for “magnetic braking radiation.” The character of magnetobremsstrahlung depends on the speeds of the electrons, so these somewhat different types of radiation are given specific names. Gyro radiation comes from electrons whose velocities are much smaller than the speed of light: $v≪c$. Mildly relativistic electrons whose kinetic energies are comparable with their rest mass $m_e⁢c^2$ emit cyclotron radiation, and ultrarelativistic electrons (kinetic energies $≫m_e⁢c^2$) produce synchrotron radiation.

Acceleration by an electric field accounts for free–free radiation, the resulting emission is called free–free radiation because the electron is free both before and after the interaction; it is not captured by the ion. If the ionized interstellar cloud is reasonably dense, the electrons and ions interact often enough that they quickly come into local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at some common temperature, so free–free radiation is usually thermal emission.

5 Added a bit of general information on getting started in radio astronomy.
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Question: From literature, I assume 3 cm is 10GHz, which should fall under either synchroton or free-free emission. But how do I know exactly?

3cm is 10 GHz and can be received with a 10 GHz receiver. The difference between synchrotron and free-free is explained on NRAO's webpage Synchrotron Radiation.

Question: From literature, I assume 3 cm is 10GHz, which should fall under either synchroton or free-free emission. But how do I know exactly?

3cm is 10 GHz and can be received with a 10 GHz receiver. The difference between synchrotron and free-free is explained on NRAO's webpage Synchrotron Radiation.

4 Added a bit of general information on getting started in radio astronomy.
source | link

I'll return for another edit in a few hours.

Further reading:

This article from the PrimaLuce Lab's website: "Radio astronomy at school with SPIDER radio telescopes" explains backyard radio astronomy.

Their 3M diameter SPIDER 500A's H142-One receiver has a 1.42 GHz superheterodyne type radiometer/ spectrometer, double conversion (type UP/DOWN) with 50 MHz bandwidth (RF=1.395MHz-1.445MHz) and 14-bit analog to digital converter. It has a spectrometer with 1024 channels (each 61 KHz) and is able to record many radio sources in the Universe, with a theoretical flow of at least 5 Jy. Price available upon request.

Their SPIDER 230C Compact Radio Telescope measures 2.3 meters and is priced at U$16K, from what I can determine from reading the literature it features the same receiver and software; dish diameter and mount capacity being the only difference, along with beam width and sensitivity.

The mesh on their dishes is good up to 5 GHz but the feedhorn normally supplied is for 1.42 GHz, I imagine that they are willing to do some amount of customization.

An explanation of the atmospheric window can be found here: "The Effects of Earth's Upper Atmosphere on Radio Signals", this image is from NASA's website: Atmospheric Windows

I'll return for another edit in a few hours.

Further reading:

Further reading:

This article from the PrimaLuce Lab's website: "Radio astronomy at school with SPIDER radio telescopes" explains backyard radio astronomy.

Their 3M diameter SPIDER 500A's H142-One receiver has a 1.42 GHz superheterodyne type radiometer/ spectrometer, double conversion (type UP/DOWN) with 50 MHz bandwidth (RF=1.395MHz-1.445MHz) and 14-bit analog to digital converter. It has a spectrometer with 1024 channels (each 61 KHz) and is able to record many radio sources in the Universe, with a theoretical flow of at least 5 Jy. Price available upon request.

Their SPIDER 230C Compact Radio Telescope measures 2.3 meters and is priced at U$16K, from what I can determine from reading the literature it features the same receiver and software; dish diameter and mount capacity being the only difference, along with beam width and sensitivity.

The mesh on their dishes is good up to 5 GHz but the feedhorn normally supplied is for 1.42 GHz, I imagine that they are willing to do some amount of customization.

An explanation of the atmospheric window can be found here: "The Effects of Earth's Upper Atmosphere on Radio Signals", this image is from NASA's website: Atmospheric Windows

3 Added some helpful links. More edits in a few hours.
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2 Added some helpful links. More edits in a few hours.
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