5
$\begingroup$

There are apparently not many reasonably priced radio telescopes available for the amateur users. I only could find this one, which costs ~10 k€. Reading the page, I don't get a good overview what kind of things I could "see" with a radio telescope that has a 2.3 meter antenna.

Is the instrument already a (semi-)professional one?

$\endgroup$
3
+50
$\begingroup$

Rather than looking for ready-made systems, take a look at projects. Right now, plenty of amateurs are using software defined radio coupled to various antennas for astronomy. Start here:

http://www.rtl-sdr.com/rtl-sdr-for-budget-radio-astronomy/

And while it has nothing to do with imaging, there's plenty of radio astronomy that amateurs can do using simple (albeit sometimes large) antennas:

http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/

http://radio-astronomy.org/pdf/qex/radio-jove-proof.pdf

http://www.radiosky.com/project.html

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ There is a Mexican radio-astronomer with a podcast who contributed to the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast. He did discuss building one's own. I can't remember his name, but his podcast (or perhaps the one from Green Bank) might be very interesting to the OP. $\endgroup$ – IchabodE Jun 4 '15 at 20:00
  • $\begingroup$ The radio jove project by NASA seems particularly interesting. Thank you. $\endgroup$ – mmh Jun 10 '15 at 17:54
5
$\begingroup$

From my simplistic analysis, it's not good for much.

For comparison, the first radio telescope was 9 meters.

One of the favorite parts of the spectrum for radio telescopes is the water hole - 21 cm.

From my quick mental arithmetic, this dish would be able to resolve sources of 21 cm signals of they were about 5 degrees apart.

I'll update with links and more when my computer is working; this is written on my phone :-)

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.