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I would like to check in which constellation the Sun was in at some time in the past, any recommendations how to do that?

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean spatially? Or directionally from our current position? Constellations are defined as relative to our view, so changing our view will essentially destroy the relative view that results in our constellations. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 9:00
  • $\begingroup$ from our current position earth $\endgroup$
    – user7549
    Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 9:12
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    $\begingroup$ i will use the software stelarium.. thanks. regards $\endgroup$
    – user7549
    Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 9:50
  • $\begingroup$ you might consider accepting one of the answers if you think it's appropriate $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Commented May 2, 2016 at 12:38

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There are plenty of online planetarium sites which should be able to do this for you. This one is the first hit for a Google search for "online planetarium software"

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  • $\begingroup$ thank you this one's great except i cant see the sun because it hasn't rise at the time, do you perhaps know of some online website that shows the whole celestial sphere from inside? thanks again... $\endgroup$
    – user7549
    Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 9:13
  • $\begingroup$ @user7549 You could keep the time but flip your location to the daylight side of the world, the Sun will still be in the same place against the fixed stars. Or use one that will allow you to look below the horizon (the one I have on my android tablet allows that). $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 9:18
  • $\begingroup$ i think i cant see the land below horizon..anyway i will use the software stelarium. thanks. regards. $\endgroup$
    – user7549
    Commented Jun 26, 2015 at 9:49
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    $\begingroup$ In Stellarium, you can disable the land (and the horizon,...) and can e. g. enable constellation lines with the buttons on the lower left. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 28, 2015 at 9:53
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh No, I'm just reporting it as the first hit, there are more than you can shake a stick at. $\endgroup$ Commented May 2, 2016 at 15:50
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In this case, Wolfram|Alpha has you covered. For example, look at the result for "which constellation was the Sun in Jan 1 1400". That said, I'm not sure this calculate includes the precession of the Earth's rotation axis, since I would've expected it to get my astrological birth sign right in 500 BC.

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