2
$\begingroup$

Is there a set of standard abbreviations for the days of the week for use in astronomy? I couldn't find any reference to it in the The IAU Style Manual (1989).

$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I'd be surprised if there was any set standard convention. The day of the week by itself has no use in astronomy unless you also know the corresponding calendar date. And since the day of the week is computable from the calendar date, it's really just superfluous information. Nevertheless, most astronomy apps such as Sky Safari seem to use the first three letters abbreviating the names for the days of the week, so you're probably safe going with that. $\endgroup$ – David H Jun 27 '15 at 11:18
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ In what language? ;) $\endgroup$ – user21 Jul 3 '15 at 2:52
  • $\begingroup$ In English @barrycarter :-p $\endgroup$ – Nabigh Jul 8 '15 at 8:44
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_week_date if you want to follow a standard... $\endgroup$ – user21 Aug 13 '15 at 19:37
1
$\begingroup$

Wikipedia uses: mon, tue, wed, thu, sat, sun.

ISO 8601 defines an exchange standard for dates based on weeks and days, which looks like this: 2017-W01-3 or this 2017W011 (Year, ISO week number, number of day of week starting with Monday). Not so surprisingly it does not standardize names of days as far as I can tell.

So you could claim to use ISO-8601 conventions and simply use 1-7 (starting with Monday).

A comprehensive listing of abbreviations of day names for European countries is given by the European Medicines Agency for blistered drugs for the curious.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

comments converted to community wiki

The day of the week by itself has no use in astronomy unless you also know the corresponding calendar date. And since the day of the week is computable from the calendar date, it's really just superfluous information. Nevertheless, most astronomy apps such as Sky Safari seem to use the first three letters (in English) abbreviating the names for the days of the week. This use seems to conform with the ISO week date standard.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ The week does represent one quarter of the Moon's phases, and the days are named after the five classical planets, the Moon and the Sun. $\endgroup$ – LocalFluff Jan 15 '17 at 22:05
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ …except Saturday in all Nordic languages, where it means "washing-day". $\endgroup$ – pela Jan 16 '17 at 8:25
  • $\begingroup$ Other languages also diverge in some cases; e.g. Italian uses sabato (Sabbath) and domenica (day “of the Lord”) for Saturday and Sunday, respectively, and German uses Mittwoch (“middle of the week”) for Wednesday. $\endgroup$ – chirlu Mar 18 '17 at 17:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.