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I do understand that galaxies were formed in the famous Big Bang. However, I also understand that if such an explosion occurs in empty space it will never form distinct galaxies, it should more or less evenly fill the whole empty space.

Many of these might clot together to form galaxies but I cannot agree that between the void of galaxies there are no other bodies.

Am I missing something?

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  1. The Big-Bang was not an explosion in empty space.

  2. Inter-galactic space is not empty, there is an inter-galactic medium, gas clouds and material ejected from galaxies, including stars and possibly globular clusters, by various mechanisms...

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There are heavenly bodies between the galaxies. In a simple way a group of stars is known as star cluster. But there are stars which are not in the star clusters. Similarly a group of planets and around a star makes up a star system(solar system for our sun) but there are planets (can't call them planets but do are small heavenly bodies) not a part of any solar system. A galaxy is a group of heavenly bodies. But there may be heavenly bodies not a part of galaxy.

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Certainly "empty" space between galaxies has some things in it. Space has properties in and of itself, such as dark energy and virtual particles appearing in pairs and then disappearing, but ignoring the virtual and the not very well understood, empty space is full of photons, more specifically, Cosmic Background Radiation and all kinds of wavelengths of light from galaxies as well as cosmic rays and a boatload of neutrinos.

Most of the matter that came out of the big bang was gravitationally drawn into galaxies, but likely not all of it, so there likely is some primordial matter between galaxies too, just not very much of it. (precisely how much is a bit over my pay grade).

Also, as Conrad Turner points out, 3 or more body gravitational interactions can from time to time, kick a planet or star out of the galaxy but gaining sufficient velocity to escape the dark matter halo completely is probably quite rare, outside of galaxy on galaxy collisions, but rogue stars/planets outside of galaxies probably happens from time to time.

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