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The pictures show exactly what my naked eye visualized.What is the cause of this?

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    $\begingroup$ What is the question? $\endgroup$ – ProfRob Dec 16 '15 at 11:45
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Since the sun is opaque, there is no such thing as seeing clouds behind it.

The picture seems to show clouds of different densities passing in front of the sun.

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It may not seem related, but here's a detailed answer: https://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/27643/why-dont-cameras-capture-dynamic-range-as-our-eyes-do

The camera doesn't differentiate between different colors and brightness nearly as well as our eyes do so in the photos you linked, both the clouds in-front of the sun and sky that's kind of around but looks behind the sun appear the same color and to our brains, it appears the sun is rising in the middle of the clouds - like a tall building or mountain peak might appear in the middle of some clouds.

If you were there in person when the photo was taken, this illusion probably wouldn't be there. (nice photos though).

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  • $\begingroup$ I was there and noticed the strange background of the sun and its color.I did not capture a picture of the sun when it was 100 percent viewable and it still had a grey back ground but I observed it.The pictures I posted are what I observed with my naked eye. I still think I need a better answer for what was captured. $\endgroup$ – user5434678 Oct 25 '15 at 6:39
  • $\begingroup$ In that case, I take back what I said about being there in person, but with the sun close to the horizon it passes through more atmosphere, and that can create a greater variety of colors or with high water vapor, darker greys so it's possible that the sky and the clouds in front of the sun, if the water content is just right, would look similar. This link (and pictures) isn't strictly related to your question, but I rather like it and it's loosely related. math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/BlueSky/blue_sky.html $\endgroup$ – userLTK Oct 25 '15 at 7:31

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