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I want to buy some meteorite and put stones made from it into gold or platinum ring. Or maybe I can use some metal meteorite for making ring? What kinds of meteorites can I use? It must be strong, non radioactive, it will be good if it pretty look. What minerals do fit?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because while I find it really interesting, it's a question about jewelry, not astronomy. $\endgroup$ – HDE 226868 Dec 6 '15 at 21:43
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I agree with @Gerold, "meteorite jewelry" usually means a band made of iron meteorite. The good thing about the way you are doing it with "stone" settings, is that it practically prevents allergic reaction plus less rusting. Frequent oiling also helps. But even so, get ONLY Gibeon or Seymchan meteorite material for the best patterns and rust-resistance. You MUST find a reputable dealer, some will LIE. Good Luck.

Oh there is also Pallasite material, very pricey, which ranges in content from silicate inclusions in an Fe-Ni matrix to Fe-Ni inclusions in a silicate matrix. Pallasites are only used as stones or inlays. Far too fragile for band material.

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Iron-nickel meteorites are made of metal alloys, either kamacite, or taenite.

But I'm a little sceptical about whether it's a good idea to make a wedding ring of it, since it may oxidize over time, and it may contain toxic elements like cobalt, or it may cause nickel allergy.

It's probably better not to use it for direct contact with skin, or humidity. However, etching it to reveal Widmanstätten patterns may look good. Better protect it from skin and air, e.g. by melting it into something like a glass containment. Account for different coefficients of thermal expansion between meteoric material and containment.

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