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A new class of Neutron stars has been found in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), This is the first time a Spinning Neutron star has ever been detected by astronomers in M31. The article states-

“pulsars” can be found in stellar couples, with the neutron star cannibalizing its neighbor. This can lead to the neutron star spinning faster and to pulses of high-energy X-rays from hot gas being funneled down magnetic fields onto the neutron star.

“It could be what we call a ‘peculiar low-mass X-ray binary pulsar’ — in which the companion star is less massive than our Sun — or alternatively an intermediate-mass binary system with a companion of about two solar masses,” said Paolo Esposito of INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Milan, Italy.

While the precise nature of the system remains unclear, the data imply that it is unusual and exotic. http://www.astronomy.com/news/2016/04/andromedas-first-spinning-neutron-star-has-been-found

Question- Could the companion of this Spinning Neutron Star not be a star at all but a Black Hole? This might explain the unusual spin and that all neutron stars do not consume other binary companions stars but rather a Black Hole is in the process of consuming the neutron stars.

The Black Hole can devour all of the outer energy of any active star leaving only the dense core of heavy metals that will eventually cool off entirely creating the rouge brown dwarf. Supernovae never derived from dying neutron stars but rather from Binary star Collisions. enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ If the pulsar is being orbited by a black hole, where does the pulsar collect gas from? (I'm not yet convinced by the assumption it's a black hole.) $\endgroup$ – Andy Apr 6 '16 at 14:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Andy- Every Star at one time had its own reserve of hydrogen,helium,carbon and neon to fuel itself. Some Stars will finish every cycle of atomic fusion and decay of old age, but most will meet the a black hole early in its cycle. This is because stars are basically bounded to a region of space while black holes seem to hunt down atomic fusion throughout the universe. I'm still pondering on why black holes seem to have a intelligent design. $\endgroup$ – user5434678 Apr 6 '16 at 15:21
  • $\begingroup$ Interested readers can find more on the Intelligent design Theory of Black holes by searching the internet for its author, Ali Frolop. $\endgroup$ – Andy Apr 6 '16 at 16:16
  • $\begingroup$ @Andy- Ahh this has already been proposed, I see I'm not the only one that thinks of every possibility being plausible until evaluated thick and thin.TRUST NOTHING TEST EVERYTHING is the motto I was sworn into. $\endgroup$ – user5434678 Apr 6 '16 at 16:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Andy- This only confirms that Black Holes do have a intelligent design. thanks for your participation. $\endgroup$ – user5434678 Apr 6 '16 at 16:32
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In the article it notes that the partner has less mass than the sun, or possibly up to about twice the mass of the sun (quite a range of uncertainty there!) It's not clear, from the article how they made these calculations, measurement of doppler shifts to get orbital velocity I suppose.

The mass suggested there is not especially small, there are pulsar binary systems in which the secondary is one hundredth the mass of the sun, and could be considered to be planets.

However it does rule out a black hole companion, which would have a mass of 3 solar masses at the least, (and more likely more than 5). There is no need to hypothesis a black hole to explain the spin.

The last few sentences in your question don't make any sense to me.

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