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Is it possible that a brown dwarf object could be orbiting our star and undetected so far by wise surveys?

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The nemesis theory proposes that a low mass star or brown dwarf in highly elliptical orbit is a companion to our sun as a solution to the cyclical mass extinction problem (http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2015/11/the-next-mass-extinction/413884/) and (http://www.space.com/22538-nemesis-star.html). Scientists noticed that some mass extinctions follow a seemingly cyclical pattern, so researchers proposed that the orbit of a small companion star (or a brown dwarf) was disturbing comets or asteroids as it approached aphelion and flinging them towards the earth.

As interesting as this would be, WISE's infrared scans of the sky have revealed nothing and there is currently no evidence supporting the theory. Furthermore the orbit of any companion would have to be very large and would therefore be very unstable and would likely be detectable. The Astrobiologist David Morrison stated of the theory: "(T)he Sun is not part of a binary star system. There has never been any evidence to suggest a companion. The idea has been disproved by several infrared sky surveys, most recently the WISE mission. If there were a brown dwarf companion, these sensitive infrared telescopes would have detected it."

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