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Let's assume 'solar eclipse' occurred

Now, at what degree 'moon' will be in 'with reference to' earth (and) at what degree 'moon' will be in 'with reference to' sun

In other words, by 'how many degrees' (out of 360 deg) the moon would have orbited 'earth' and 'sun' in the event of 'solar eclipse'?

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  • $\begingroup$ Its not clear what you mean by "degree". Do you mean the position in the sky? Or the position in the orbit? Your question may be closed as being unclear. $\endgroup$ – James K May 7 '16 at 6:54
  • $\begingroup$ @James I edited the question. Sorry, as I am a beginner I am able to ask questions within my limitations $\endgroup$ – Sathish Kumar May 7 '16 at 8:05
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If I understand your question correctly:

The moon and sun have a visual angle of ~32 Arcminutes. So during a total solar eclipse, from when it begins to when it ends, the moon traverses ~64 Arcminutes (one edge touching to edge of the sun to the opposite side at the end which is two diameters) relative to the sun. But in actuality it will have travelled further with respect to your viewing location.

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    $\begingroup$ Did you mean arcminutes? $\endgroup$ – Mike G May 7 '16 at 18:49
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    $\begingroup$ Ah, yes I did, a 16 hour work day will do that to you $\endgroup$ – Tanenthor May 8 '16 at 7:10
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Total and annular solar eclipses occur where the Sun-Earth-Moon angle is 0$^\circ$. Where that angle is smaller than 0.5$^\circ$ but not 0$^\circ$, there is a partial solar eclipse. The Sun-Moon-Earth angle at those times is 180$^\circ$. Due to the Moon's orbital inclination, most new moons miss eclipse alignment, some by as much as 5$^\circ$.

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  • $\begingroup$ "Sun-Moon-Earth angle at those times is 180∘" - Sorry, does it mean that earth would have also rotated 180 deg on its own axis? $\endgroup$ – Sathish Kumar May 10 '16 at 14:42
  • $\begingroup$ I meant the angle, with Moon as vertex, between Sun and Earth. This Solar Eclipse Geometry diagram may clarify it. $\endgroup$ – Mike G May 10 '16 at 15:35

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