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With the discovery of the Higgs Boson as the mass carrier, what is the possibility at the centre of a black hole being so dense and gravity so infinite that the structure of a proton or neutron are ripped apart into their fundamental elements by these extreme energies that Higgs Bosons are massed together at the centre, while the remaining massless subatomic particles are just outside this layer, similar to an onion (Similar to a star as more elements fuse together they become more dense, and gravity forces them to the centre again like an onion)

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closed as unclear what you're asking by HDE 226868, Sir Cumference, Hohmannfan, James K, Dean Jun 13 '16 at 9:12

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ I am proposing migrating this very interesting Q to the Physics Stack Exchange. $\endgroup$ – Aabaakawad Jun 10 '16 at 18:50
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this as unclear what you're asking. I don't follow the logic. For this reason, I disagree with @Aabaakawad's migration proposal (though if you make the question clearer, I'd say he's totally right). $\endgroup$ – HDE 226868 Jun 10 '16 at 20:20
  • $\begingroup$ I gave an answer to what I think your question is about, but I agree with HDE. Better to stick to one point at a time, like asking first if Higgs Bosons are created inside black holes first as a stand alone question and a separate question of what the inside of black holes might be like and even there, the 2nd question borders on the too hypothetical. $\endgroup$ – userLTK Jun 11 '16 at 6:34
  • $\begingroup$ As to your title question "Higgs Boson in the center of extremely large stars", The Higgs particle was detected by enormously high energy collision. Even in the largest stars, (I'm pretty sure) don't have close to the level of collision energy needed to regularly form Higgs Bosons. That's fraction of a second after the big bang energy. Even large stars don't have that. The occasional (perhaps virtual) Higgs may get formed inside stars, but they're probably not common. $\endgroup$ – userLTK Jun 11 '16 at 7:40
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No. That's not what a black hole is. A black hole is a vacuum solution to general relativity. In other words a black hole is just mass, without a "thing" left to be massive. The mass is collapsed to a singularity, and is surrounded by an event horizon.

If you pass over the event horizon, every path you can take in will lead you to the singularity. In this sense the singularity is more like a point in time than a point in space. You can't "see" the singularity, since it is always in your future (you can only see things that are in the past)

There is no "thing" at the singularity, There are no protons neutrons or higgs bosons, and any that are formed will find themselves at the singularity, and ceasing to exist in a short time.

So black holes are very very weird. They can't be easily understood my analogy. They are understood in terms of Einstein's mathematical theory of general relativity.

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With the discovery of the Higgs Boson as the mass carrier, what is the possibility at the centre of a black hole being so dense and gravity so infinite that the structure of a proton or neutron are ripped apart into their fundamental elements by these extreme energies that Higgs Bosons are massed together at the centre,

The center of a black hole is full of uncertainties. There's likely enough energy at the center of a black hole to create Higgs Boson particles by high energy collisions, or, other energy exchanges or whatever goes on inside there, but nobody knows for sure. There's a lot of uncertainty as to exactly what happens inside a black hole.

while the remaining massless subatomic particles are just outside this layer, similar to an onion (Similar to a star as more elements fuse together they become more dense, and gravity forces them to the centre again like an onion)

There's an error in this question. No subatomic particles are massless. subatomic particles can be without restmass, but they must have energy and energy has mass. Inside a black hole, both rest mass particles and particles with no rest mass are still drawn towards the center. It's bad physics to think of the inside of a black hole as "layers" going from more dense to less dense. That model breaks down once gravitational acceleration exceeds the speed of light.

Every other large/massive non-black-hole object in the universe that's gravitationally bound tends to form some degrees of density layering, even Neutron Stars, but black holes don't necessarily follow that model and thinking of the center of a black hole as different layers of density is probably a bad way to think about it.

I'd like to add that the Higgs (which gives rest mass by interaction between some particles and the Higgs field) and Gravity, might not be as strong as you think. More on that here, and some background reading on the Higgs here.

and some loosely related questions on whether the Higgs particle happens in nature here and here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the answer, My question was relating to Black Holes and the pressures and densities withing the Black Hole. I understand that the Black Hole is a singularity, but that's just another word for "I don't know". $\endgroup$ – Roman Jun 13 '16 at 17:16
  • $\begingroup$ There is mention that particles emit fields. if the field can create a gravity wave like a sine wave, that's a distortion of space time. Take for instance a car driving down a wavy road ( line a huge sine wave), a person on a bike (Going slower) taking a straight line approach could end up being ahead of the car, giving the appearance it's traveling faster than the car.I understand that all subatomic particles have mass even neutrinos. $\endgroup$ – Roman Jun 13 '16 at 17:31
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry it limits my commets $\endgroup$ – Roman Jun 13 '16 at 17:32
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry it limits my comments. and don't use the enter key. I understand all particles have mass even the Neutrino. But inside the Black Hole forces are so strong and currently un-measurable. The standard model goes wonky inside this entity, I just pondered on the possibility that even the singularity may have layers of some sorts. Just about everything has layers to one degree or another ( molecules --> Atoms --> quarks --> ? ) $\endgroup$ – Roman Jun 13 '16 at 17:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Roman inside a black hole, nobody knows what goes on. Layers are possible, but it's a different set of rules. I just wanted to point out that, while layers works for everything else, inside a black hole it might behave differently. Space is shaped differently too as objects can no longer move up or down based on density, everything moves only down. Nobody knows if there's an object of some kind inside the black hole or if it shrinks to a singularity or Planck length. Your logic works for Neutron stars, I don't think it works for inside black holes. $\endgroup$ – userLTK Jun 13 '16 at 21:39

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