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Are there any planets not orbiting a celestial body which can support life despite the temperature? Also what is the absolute minimum temperature that life can survive in?

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    $\begingroup$ So far, no planet has been discovered that can support life of the sort that we know here. Certainly not human life. (We could attempt to speculate about "other types" of life but I don't think we can do that with any certainty.) This might be a good question for the "world building" stack exchange though $\endgroup$ – Andy Jun 17 '16 at 9:46
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    $\begingroup$ @Andy -- So far, we've discovered one planet that can support life. It's the one we're standing on. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Jun 17 '16 at 20:40
  • $\begingroup$ A rouge planet with a thick ice cover could contain a long-lasting ocean, this is the Steppenwolf planet hypothesis. A high pressure hydrogen atmosphere would also preserve enough heat on a rogue planet to allow liquid water at the surface. $\endgroup$ – AlaskaRon Jun 18 '16 at 23:45
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IHMO, I think it is possible into any planet with a hot core, that means if there is life on some of this planets they should be on the subterran part of the planet on underneath the deep freezed oceans, underground seas and caves, that means too that the life we will find on such planets will be quite shiny and probably looking like much of the animals we find at deep see here on earth.

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We have not yet discovered any planets that are certainly capable of supporting life, (except Earth) and the few rogue planets that we do believe that we have found have been gas giants, no good for life.

It is unlikely that life could exist on a rogue planet. The surface of a terrestrial planet that was not in orbit around a star would be exceedingly cold, as cold as Pluto.

The only place for life to start would be in a layer of liquid water, similar to that on Enceladus. If the core were sufficiently warm, it could maintain a liquid water layer, under a thick layer of ices.

No such rogue planet is known to exist.

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