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As best as is known, what is the latest thinking on in the issue of,

in which constellation was GW150914, and in which constellation was GW151226?

(That is to say, within the large uncertainty, as best as is known in what direction is the likely center of that uncertainty?)

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  • $\begingroup$ FWIW I actually could not find this info, in a quick popular-science-level search. If it's a dupe (which I could not find), thanks for the pointer. $\endgroup$ – Fattie Sep 30 '16 at 19:22
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    $\begingroup$ You can't locate them that accurately. They may have come from a number of constellations. You can find maps easily enough, but I haven't found one with constellations marked. ligo.caltech.edu/image/ligo20160211b $\endgroup$ – ProfRob Sep 30 '16 at 21:37
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The data is indeed very uncertain. As for GW150914, LIGO posted this image of the probable area of the sky:

Black hole merge event location

The most probable banana-shaped region stretches from Crux to the Large Magellanic cloud. Comparing the image with a constellation map, there are several small constellations that may have hosted the event. Those are Mensa, Chamaeleon, Musca and Crux.

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