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Is it possible to send data using cosmic rays?

Like sending high and low energy cosmic rays, since they can travel farther. And this data can be converted to binary form that can be processed by computers.

I'm not an astronomer or studied any thing related to astronomy, I was just imagining if this is possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ Cosmic rays are produced in space (hence the cosmic part). They're extremely high energy, on the order of $GeV$ or even $TeV$ and higher. Only top-notch particle accelerators can achieve even the lowest end of the required energy, and not easily at that. $\endgroup$ – zephyr Oct 13 '16 at 14:45
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Most of the communication on Earth and to-fro Space takes place over low frequency visible, infrared, micro and radio wave spectrum of the electromagnetic spectrum.

The immediate benefits of using low frequency EM spectrum which I think of are as following:

  1. They are not blocked by Earth's atmosphere and magnetic field. On the other hand, cosmic rays which consists mostly of high energy electrons, protons and ß particles carries electric charge and magnetic field. Hence, they will be hugely affected by Earth's magnetic field. Maybe setting up receivers and transmitters at poles helps a little.

2.Speed: EM waves travel at light speed, cosmic rays always travel at lesser speed which brings me to the next point.

  1. Energy needs: The energy required to generate radio waves can be provided by low power solar panels. However, to generate cosmic rays one would need a particle accelerator. Something like a portable LHC, which I don't think is feasible. Moreover, if you want to generate faster cosmic rays then you have to put in more energy.

I can only think of these constraints at this moment. I don't know if sending information via cosmic rays carries any advantage.

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