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What existed before the big bang?

What all thing are there inside big bang object ?.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Astronomy Stack Exchange, please check the astronomy.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-ask page before asking a question to make sure your question doesn't get closed down. May I suggest searching this site for similar questions before asking your own? $\endgroup$
    – Dean
    Jan 23 '17 at 11:54
  • $\begingroup$ Coordinate systems designated by letters other than 't'. 'j' may have fulfilled the function of our current 't', or not. No one knows. $\endgroup$ Jan 24 '17 at 17:22
  • $\begingroup$ Before existed before the Big Bang? $\endgroup$
    – jean
    Jan 24 '17 at 19:16
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    $\begingroup$ This question is not opinion based. There is a serious scientific answer stating that science doesn't know and that the question barely makes sense. Some scientific sources have dealt with that question. For example, Hawking discussed it in "A brief history of time". $\endgroup$
    – Pere
    Jan 24 '17 at 21:01
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    $\begingroup$ Who are the 4 people who voted this up? Any answers based in science would be highly mathematical and technical and not very interesting to a layman and all answers remain untestable. It's a mathematical exercise into the world of maybe (like string theory). It's perhaps a fun conversation to have when scientists are drinking beers on a Sunday afternoon, but it's not stack exchange astronomy.with a distinct answer. When the model takes you Into the singularity, there are no answers, so before the singularity there are also no answers. $\endgroup$
    – userLTK
    Jan 25 '17 at 1:57
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We don't have theories that can describe the big bang (or whatever happened) properly so we can't say anything definite about the big bang itself, let alone if/what was before it. We would need (at a minimum) something like a quantum field theory for gravity and we don't have one yet. We've no reason to think that's all we'd need.

It's not even possible (as I understand it) to define "before" the big bang. Time, in essence, started at the big bang. It has no common sense meaning beyond that.

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  • $\begingroup$ Additionally, we can't see further back than the CMB and this is already ~ 380.000 years after what we assume as the big bang so everything earlier than that point currently cannot be verified. $\endgroup$
    – Adwaenyth
    Jan 23 '17 at 13:12

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