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I have seen the term superficial gravity used and it seems to be equivalent to surface gravity

seen, e.g., here http://arxiv.org/pdf/1701.02295

Is there any difference between superficial and surface gravity? When should one be using one or the other?

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    $\begingroup$ The author is Portuguese. In Portuguese, "surface" is "superfície". If you look at the equations, you'll see that the definition ($\log g$) corresponds to "surface gravity". I suspect the standard term has been lost in translation. $\endgroup$
    – pela
    Commented Apr 2, 2017 at 18:39
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    $\begingroup$ @pela even in English the word "superficial" means "on (or above) the surface." $\endgroup$
    – Asher
    Commented Apr 8, 2017 at 23:14
  • $\begingroup$ The author in not Portuguese. Brazilian, instead. But he speaks Portuguese, though. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 18, 2019 at 15:23

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The term "superficial" means "on the surface," so "superficial gravity" is the same as surface gravity. As @pela pointed out in the comments, the author of the article is Portuguese and in that language the word for surface is 'superficie.'

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