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Googling is giving me both Galileo Galilei and Nicolas Copernicus as the answer. I am sorry and will remove this question if it is an opinion based question.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by StephenG, userLTK, Rob Jeffries, Sir Cumference, David Hammen Jun 18 '17 at 0:54

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ It is opinion based, I'm afraid. What constitutes "modern astronomy" and who is the "father" of it are not things that can be decided in any other way. $\endgroup$ – adrianmcmenamin Jun 17 '17 at 12:47
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    $\begingroup$ If we must name someone, then IMO it's either Einstein or Hubble. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Jun 17 '17 at 15:58
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    $\begingroup$ I like the Hubble answer. I'd define modern astronomy as the discovery that the Universe extended beyond the Milky way. Einstein was obviously huge. I might call him the father of modern science. (Opinion based, obviously). Fritz Zwicky isn't a bad answer for the father of modern astronomy either. $\endgroup$ – userLTK Jun 17 '17 at 18:31
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I would say Copernicus. He did his work maybe 100 years earlier and formulated the heliocentric view of the universe.

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