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Am not asking about planetary/meteorite surfaces and am restricting myself to the interstellar medium

edit: by interstellar medium I mean, the following:

"Interstellar medium (ISM) is the matter that exists in the space between the star systems in a galaxy. This matter includes gas in ionic, atomic, and molecular form, as well as dust and cosmic rays. It fills interstellar space and blends smoothly into the surrounding intergalactic space."

(copied verbatim from a google search).

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  • $\begingroup$ Some context please. What do you already understand about the nature of the interstellar medium would help write a useful answer. $\endgroup$ – James K Jul 11 '17 at 17:49
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Basically, No. for liquid as we commonly know them on earth. If you trow a water bucket in space, it gets quickly vaporized. From this interesting ref:

having a pressure vacuum will cause the water to boil almost instantly

There is however an exception I've been thinking of. Since glass has an amorphous structure, it can also be regarded as a liquid... And if some advanced form of life or intelligence managed to send some into the interstellar medium, then yes there is.

It's also possible that some stellar explosion send away magma of some form with an amorphous structure similar to that of glass (e.g. obsidian)

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi Zephyr - by interstellar medium I mean, the following: "medium (ISM) is the matter that exists in the space between the star systems in a galaxy. This matter includes gas in ionic, atomic, and molecular form, as well as dust and cosmic rays. It fills interstellar space and blends smoothly into the surrounding intergalactic space." (copied verbatim from a google search). So I guess this is what I am talking about $\endgroup$ – RaRa Jul 11 '17 at 17:15
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    $\begingroup$ Hi Chomel - Thanks for your answer! I don't consider the "supercooled liquid" a.k.a glassy phase. to be a liquid itself. $\endgroup$ – RaRa Jul 11 '17 at 17:17
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    $\begingroup$ All liquids have vapor pressure: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vapor_pressure If you toss them into a vacuum, they will boil until they freeze, leaving a gas and a solid. Helium is an exception, as it does not normally freeze, it will simply boil away to nothing. $\endgroup$ – Wayfaring Stranger Jul 12 '17 at 13:37

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