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Anyone know if there is a List of Moving stars on the northern Europe hemisphere I can search for? Like Barnard's

I wish to image them [when possible] and compare their yearly movement.

Thank you

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    $\begingroup$ Obviously all stars are "moving" - though in some/many cases the movement may be so small as to be undetectable on a scale of a human lifetime. But what scale are you looking for? And presumably you mean proper motion and not parallax? $\endgroup$ – adrianmcmenamin Jul 14 '17 at 14:03
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    $\begingroup$ Some stars move 20 times faster than others, i.e. those which have been formed by a supernova that compressed it's surroundings some time ago, they sometimes travel in groups quite fast compared to other stars stemming from one region of space. Perhaps barnard's is one of those, i can't recall, i read a research on the origin of some fast moving stars some eons ago. barnard is perhaps the fastest moving star in the sky. $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Jul 14 '17 at 14:13
  • $\begingroup$ I am no scientist but an amateur astronomer wishing to image the 'easiest for an amateur' I am looking for moving stars/objects: 1. Over 15° DEC S-E to S-W 2. No West 3. No North - apart from near Polaris 4. East only over 45° DEC My Horizon is ~54° North UK I was wondering if there was a Listing as these days there are quite a few listing of various Cosmological Objects, but I could not find them. Thanks for your time $\endgroup$ – AstroStak Jul 16 '17 at 8:19
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What you're looking for is stars with "High Proper Motion". A Google search of "High proper motion stars" will provide a number of such lists. A quick look at Wikipedia gives this link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proper_motion#Stars_with_high_proper_motion

You can follow the links to individual stars if you wish to determine their latitudes.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you want the circumpolar stars? They are visible most of the year. $\endgroup$ – jmh Jul 22 '17 at 18:23
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SIMBAD allows you to search for stars given various criteria.

I searched for:

Dec > -20 (easily visible from most locations in the Northern hemisphere)

Vmag < 4 (easy naked eye objects)

pm > 1000 (more than 1 arcsecond of proper motion per year.

I got 8 results (including a double star counted twice)

#|       identifier        |typ|  coord1 (ICRS,J2000/2000)   |Mag U |Mag B |Mag V |Mag R |Mag I |  spec. type   |#bib|#not
-|-------------------------|---|-----------------------------|------|------|------|------|------|---------------|----|----
1|* tau Cet                |PM*|01 44 04.08338 -15 56 14.9262| 4.43 | 4.22 | 3.50 | 2.88 | 2.41 |G8V            | 963|   1
2|* alf CMa                |** |06 45 08.91728 -16 42 58.0171|-1.51 |-1.46 |-1.46 |-1.46 |-1.43 |A1V+DA         |1281|   3
3|* alf Boo                |RG*|14 15 39.67207 +19 10 56.6730| 2.46 | 1.18 |-0.05 |-1.03 |-1.68 |K1.5IIIFe-0.5  |1947|   0
4|* alf CMa A              |SB*|06 45 08.917 -16 42 58.02    |     ~|     ~|-1.09 |     ~|     ~|A1V            |1192|   0
5|* eta Cas                |SB*|00 49 06.29070 +57 48 54.6758| 4.04 | 4.02 | 3.44 | 2.94 | 2.58 |F9V+M0-V       | 544|   0
6|* alf CMi                |SB*|07 39 18.11950 +05 13 29.9552| 0.82 | 0.79 | 0.37 |-0.05 |-0.28 |F5IV-V+DQZ     |1635|   1
7|* tet UMa                |SB*|09 32 51.43390 +51 40 38.2811| 3.67 | 3.64 | 3.18 | 2.74 | 2.47 |F7V            | 353|   1
8|* gam Ser                |V* |15 56 27.18269 +15 39 41.8206| 4.31 | 4.34 | 3.84 | 3.37 | 3.13 |F6IV           | 500|   0

This includes some "famous" stars: Tau Cet is a nearby star that is similar to the sun. Alf CMa is Sirus. Alf Boo is Arcturus. Alf CMi is Procyon. Tet UMa (Theta Ursa Major) is circumpolar in much of the Northern hemisphere.

One arcsecond is a very small change. You should simulate the motion in software to understand the accuracy needed to detect such a motion.

There may be a difficulty insomuch as these stars are so bright that they will outshine any nearby stars making their relative motion harder to measure. You may be better searching for dimmer, but faster moving stars.

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