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So it was around 6 AM and i was looking at the sky and there were not many visible stars because the sun was about to rise. There were two stars that were brighter than the others and i was looking at them for about 5 mins. They weren't moving and the space between them seemed very little. Suddenly, one of those stars started moving down in direction towards the horizon and the other remained still. The star continued to go down. In 1 or 2 minutes it went behind the horizon and stopped being visible, while the other was still at the same place like earlier. At first I thought that the moving object was a satellite, but then i realised that a satellite would orbit the earth with constant speed, and the object i saw remained still for atleast 5 mins. So what else can it be???

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marked as duplicate by James K, David Hammen, Sir Cumference, adrianmcmenamin, zephyr Jul 17 '17 at 13:03

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  • $\begingroup$ It could have been a plane that was heading directly toward your line of sight that then proceeded to turn toward the ground. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Jul 15 '17 at 8:53
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If it disappeared towards east or so, as I think because the other "star" should be Venus, that it can be a satellite - or even more an airplane - as seen from "its rear". Basically at first it went far along the line of your line of sight looking still, until finally you could see the curvature of its path. From crude geometric feeling it was most likely an airplane, a lower altitude make it easy the seeing "from the rear" (think about what you see observing the rear light of a car moving on an horizontal road towards a down hill. It looks more or less two lights in the dark then it disappears. Or a ship approaching horizon). About absence of blinking: if it indeed was an airplane mirroring the sunlight, not way to see the less intense "navigation" lights.

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