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I know there are a number of parameters that determine the occurrence of a solar or lunar eclipse. The number should be 18; 6 degrees of freedom for 3 rigid bodies. But can't figure out why eclipses are not repeated.

When we have a night with a full moon, the next night we again have a close-to-full moon, so it can be considered a distribution over several days. What prevents the same happening for eclipses? Is it possible to have two semi-eclipses in two consecutive days? If not, why does such a big difference occur over just a day?

Thanks,

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You have to remember that the alignment for an eclipse is a very rare situation. It's not as simple as the occurrence of a new moon. The planet and the moon have to align just so in relation to the sun for an eclipse to occur. Sorry, no numbers here but just trying to emphasize that several factors have to occur between 2 fast moving bodies.

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