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I really liked the clever way the author explained stuff in this book but I already understood most of it. Neil himself states in the book that if you are not in a hurry and want to know more about the topic the are plenty of bigger books you can look into. So my question is: what is sort of a next step after this book on this topic (astronomy, astrophysics)? Thanks.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Carl Witthoft, StephenG, Rory Alsop, Cody, Sir Cumference Sep 20 '17 at 2:01

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ You would need to describe your ability at mathematics and physics to get advice. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Sep 19 '17 at 10:00
  • $\begingroup$ I have a masters degree in cybernetics and robotics but when it comes to astronomy I am fairly new. I think I would be able to get around some physics and math. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Sep 20 '17 at 12:37
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I liked Black holes & time warps by Kip Thorne. Here's the link. While being easy to understand, he does go into some details regarding black holes and the warping of time, which I think are interesting to the casual reader. If you have a science degree, you might not learn much new informations, but it's a good read.

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