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Aside from the fact that nothing we know of, excluding pure energy can escape from black holes.

They affect both space and time in a manner that nothing else can quite compare to, and usually have smaller black holes orbiting the supermassive black holes.

Aside from this, not much is known about these naturally occurring eaters of everything.

That said, additional information tells us that blackholes both have a North and South Pole, and also drift through space.

Also to be noted, they have strong electromagnetic fields near the horizon.

Now although unconfirmed, it's assumed that these magnetic fields are generated by an object orbiting the blackholes.

Now onto magnetic fields/waves.

Despite my hours upon hours of researching, I couldn't find any facts stating that electromagnetic fields/waves have any weight value.

Although I did find out that it is possible to transmit information using electromagnetic fields/waves.

That said, until proven wrong I can safely theorize that black holes do generate electromagnetic fields, possibly even generated after the horizon and escaping. (However, I am uncertain, just as anybody else is.)

That said, in theory, if you can figure out how to map objects with electromagnetic fields/waves, you could very well study the internal area of a black hole. Of course, the previous theory would also have to be correct.

Is it possible to investigate the inside of a black hole using electromagnetic waves generated after the horizon?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Carl Witthoft, Sir Cumference, zephyr, MBR, Donald.McLean Nov 6 '17 at 20:58

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ What is your question, exactly? $\endgroup$ – chirlu Oct 9 '17 at 10:14
  • $\begingroup$ My question is wether or not this would be something possible, I have a very basic understanding of the universe, so I was hoping others who have a better understanding, would be able to correct/inform me on these things. $\endgroup$ – Fair Microbe Oct 9 '17 at 17:29
  • $\begingroup$ That makes sense, but it also doesn't make sense, currently as the hydroncollider has proven time and time again, we can hold both matter and antimatter separate using magnetic fields. But as stated before I couldn't find any assigned weight value to the actual waves of magnetics. If they have no weight value then they should be uneffected by gravitational pull. So I'm asking if they do have a weight value, this would render the theory impossible, or probable. $\endgroup$ – Fair Microbe Oct 9 '17 at 19:00
  • $\begingroup$ "pure energy" ?? Other than being a STTOS trope, what do you think energy is? $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Oct 10 '17 at 17:21
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I'll try to answer paragraph by paragraph, since there are some misconceptions here.

Aside from the fact that nothing we know of, excluding pure energy can escape from black holes.

Nothing can escape from beyond the event horizon, including "pure energy" (whatever that means)

They affect both space and time in a manner that nothing else can quite compare to, and usually have smaller black holes orbiting the supermassive black holes.

Binary black holes do exist, but are quite rare. There is no reason to think that supermassive black holes are orbited by smaller black holes (although black holes are quite common, so it isn't impossible)

Aside from this, not much is known about these naturally occurring eaters of everything.

We actually know quite a lot, although some is theoretical. Predictions of General relativity are well supported by observation.

Also to be noted, they have strong electromagnetic fields near the horizon. Now although unconfirmed, it's assumed that these magnetic fields are generated by an object orbiting the blackholes.

Black holes are surrounded by magnetic fields, generated in the accretion disc of matter orbiting the blackhole.

Despite my hours upon hours of researching, I couldn't find any facts stating that electromagnetic fields/waves have any weight value. Although I did find out that it is possible to transmit information using electromagnetic fields/waves.

Electromagnetic waves are "Light". Short wavelength electromagnetic waves are ultraviolet, X-rays and gamma rays. Long wavelength electromagnetic waves are radio waves. They don't have mass, but are affected by gravity.

That said, until proven wrong I can safely theorize that black holes do generate electromagnetic fields, possibly even generated after the horizon and escaping. (However, I am uncertain, just as anybody else is.)

Electromagnetic waves (ie light) cannot escape from a black hole. Nothing escapes from black hole. You can investigate the accretion disc by "looking" at it (ie detecting electromagnetic radiation). You can't investigate the inside of a black hole, since nothing escapes.

Is it possible to investigate the inside of a black hole using electromagnetic waves generated after the horizon?

Hence, No. This isn't possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I appreciate the breakdown, again I have lots to learn, and by no means do I wish to resend I know everything, anything I stated was what I've been told, and I understand things that are said can be incorrect. I'm glad you she'd some light on this for me. Thanks again. $\endgroup$ – Fair Microbe Oct 9 '17 at 23:19
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You seem to believe that since electromagnetic radiation has no mass, it is not affected by black holes. Instead, think about it like this; on Earth, if you drop a 10 pound bowling ball and a 20 pound bowling ball, they will both hit the ground at the same time. Similarly, even though a photon is a massless particle, it is still affected by the gravity of the black hole and therefore cannot escape the event horizon. Instead, when black holes consume matter, the matter accelerates extremely quickly, producing electromagnetic radiation outside of the event horizon that we can detect with specialized telescopes. A popular example of this is the recent interaction between the gas cloud G2 and the supermassive black hole in the center of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*. Sag A* sucked in the gas and in the process released a large amount of x-ray and gamma radiation that could be easily detected by our telescopes.

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