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The title says it : I am looking for the word to use for a point, located on Earth surface (maybe an hypothetical perfectly spherical Earth), that has the same coordinates as a specific star, and therefore can be considered to be "under" the star in layman's terms.

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  • $\begingroup$ But such a position can only be transient, so there is no such definition involving the coordinates being the same? $\endgroup$ – Rob Jeffries Nov 6 '17 at 0:53
  • $\begingroup$ What is wrong with the word "under" or "beneath" ? You do need to specify time to relate that to a location on the Earth. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Nov 6 '17 at 5:07
  • $\begingroup$ "Subsolar point" and "sublunar point" are used for sun and moon. Not sure I've ever heard of a more general term used for other objects. $\endgroup$ – BowlOfRed Nov 6 '17 at 6:21
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    $\begingroup$ Meet me at the subsirius point at 130am UT on July 12th 2018. This describe a single point and time on the earth's surface. You could use any other star or planet. $\endgroup$ – Wayfaring Stranger Nov 6 '17 at 15:28
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    $\begingroup$ And remember your cozzie, that's right in the middle of the Pacific (16*44' S 176* W) $\endgroup$ – James K Nov 6 '17 at 18:05
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Positions are usually given relative to the observer, not relative to the object. So instead of saying "I am under the star X", you would say "star X is overhead". The word for an object directly overhead is zenith: "the star X is at the zenith".

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  • $\begingroup$ Related, but I don't think the appropriate answer is the term Nadir. This is the point directly below the observer. If the object is directly overhead, at the observer's Zenith, then the point on the Earth under the object is the observers Nadir. $\endgroup$ – zephyr Nov 6 '17 at 13:44
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The point on the earth where the sun is directly overhead is commonly called the subsolar point. I've also heard sublunar point which would be the point corresponding to the moon.

I'm not aware of any more general term for this point relating to any other astronomical objects.

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    $\begingroup$ I think "sub-stellar" point would be understood. $\endgroup$ – James K Nov 6 '17 at 17:43

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