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When DST is introduced does it mean that the sun is in zenith one hour later (1pm winter local time) or one hour earlier (11am winter local time)?

Edit: The location is New York.

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  • $\begingroup$ Isn't the zenith the point in the sky directly above the observer? Are you asking about when something will be at your zenith? For that, we would need a location on Earth too. $\endgroup$ – user10106 Nov 29 '17 at 11:53
  • $\begingroup$ @Kozaky I mean the sun :) at what time will be the sun in zenith when there is Daylight saving time. $\endgroup$ – Mike Nov 29 '17 at 13:17
  • $\begingroup$ Where? The sun will be in zenith in Madrid about 2 hours later then in Berlin, although Berlin and Madrid have the same time zone (f.e. at 12:00 in Berlin and two hours later at 14:00 in Madrid). And the sun will be almost at the same time in zenith in Barcelona and London although Barcelona and London have 1 hour time difference (f.e. at 12:30 in London and AT THE SAME TIME at 13:30 in Barcelona). $\endgroup$ – Zvezdochet Nov 29 '17 at 14:13
  • $\begingroup$ And note that strictly speaking, the sun may be in zenith only between 23°26′ of south latitude and 23°26′ of north latitude. So you'll never see sun in zenith neither in Berlin, nor in London, nor in Madrid nor in Barcelona as well as in many other cities. $\endgroup$ – Zvezdochet Nov 29 '17 at 14:21
  • $\begingroup$ @Zvezdochet Thanks for comments. Very interesting. As for "zenith" is there better term for "point of highest altitude" or is this called "highest altitude"? $\endgroup$ – Mike Nov 29 '17 at 14:36
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In general, daylight saving time (DST) is not used in the winter. In New York, DST is used in spring, summer, and fall. (Since the start date was changed from April to March, technically DST does begin before winter ends.)

If the Sun is on the meridian at noon local time (and at its highest point), that would correspond to 1 pm DST.

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