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Two days ago I went to a mathematics conference where there was a paper presented on Jupiter's formation via the disk-instability model.

I know that there are two different theories for the formation of the planets. One of them is the Core accretion model and the other one is the disk-instability model. I also tried to read this paper on planetary formation in which they said 161 planets were put on to test. 90% followed Core accretion model and rest of them followed the later model. Did not say anything explicit about Jupiter.

Jupiter is too close to the Sun to follow the Disk-Instability model (I am not sure completely).

Now I want to know which model Jupiter follows for its formation.
(I asked this question on physics stack-exchange too but unfortunately there were no answers)

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    $\begingroup$ Currently nobody knows. There are two possible options being pursued - core accretion and disk instability... $\endgroup$
    – ProfRob
    Commented Dec 13, 2017 at 7:01
  • $\begingroup$ But that is the answer to the question you have asked. $\endgroup$
    – ProfRob
    Commented Dec 13, 2017 at 22:00

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Maxwell's Smith Prize Essay on the formation of the Rings of Saturn is relevant. Using structural stability as his criterion, he deduced that the 'rings' could only consist of a single almost infinite mass of very small particulates each orbiting in accord with Newtonian dynamics--the correct result as verified by NASA/ Cassini. Applying the same approach to a forming solar system this analysis shows that rings of particulates are a structurally stable attractor for the dynamics, provided the central star is much larger than the mean particulate size. I am now well outside my comfort zone so will leave further inferences to others :). Maxwell's essay on rings of saturn

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  • $\begingroup$ How does this relate to the formation of Jupiter? $\endgroup$
    – ProfRob
    Commented Dec 26, 2017 at 15:31
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    $\begingroup$ improved my answer on the basis of a kind comment $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 27, 2017 at 6:55

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