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Need Help. I have a problem with my 50 mm objective with 500mm focal length refractor telescope. I can see moon clearly. I have 18 mm and 9 mm eyepieces.

I see Jupiter and Venus as a bright point when focused at 30x or 60x and I see white disk when out of focus. While I have successfully resolved double stars with it and I saw Pleiades star cluster clearly with it, I cant see the moons of Jupiter.

Should I buy 3x Barlow to see the bigger image? is low magnification is my problem? Or there is another solution to this problem.?

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    $\begingroup$ When asking questions, you should consider using a spell checker and taking care with English grammar. Making your question easy to understand will increase the likelihood of it being answered. $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Mar 12 '18 at 14:37
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    $\begingroup$ 10X is a little low to easily see the phase of Venus. The 28X you'll get with your 18mm objective should reveal it. $\endgroup$ Mar 12 '18 at 15:37
  • $\begingroup$ There is no doubt you didn't align your boresight to Jupiter. Try finding the planet at low magnification and then swapping in a higher-mag eyepiece. $\endgroup$ Mar 12 '18 at 15:43
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You should definitely be able to see the 4 main moons of Jupiter. You won’t need additional magnification - they can be seen through 10 x binoculars. It’s possible that when you looked the moons were close to or behind Jupiter, so worth trying again. Or it may be that James is right and you were looking at a star. As for the bands on Jupiter, these are quite subtle but at 60x magnification, 2 dark bands should be visible. Don’t expect to see the Great Red Spot, at least initially.

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Take a look at http://www.deepskywatch.com/Articles/what-can-i-see-through-telescope.html

Note the example picture of Jupiter, shown to simulate its size (on a typical computer screen) when viewed at a magnification of 180x. If you use 60x magnification, your view will be a third of the size.

Planetary discs are really small!

However, you should see something that isn't point-like with some banding. And you certainly should be able to see the moons (which do look like a line of stars) and are visible even in a small pair of binoculars.

The fix could depend on what is wrong, which could be any of a range of problems, from "silly mistakes" (such as pointing the telescope a bright star instead of a planet) or lens that aren't what they claim to be. Atmospheric problems (like trying to view through a window), or technical problems (if a telescope isn't properly collimated). Your best bet might be to find local experts, a local astronomy club or similar.

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