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I have completely no idea about astronomy, but I am starting growing interest in it as I have been always wondering on what has been discovered out there and since I am studying CS, maybe I will learn more than I think as CS and astronomy as relative to some point. How should I start? Can you suggest me a good website for example or something else?

(I know this is an opinion - based question but still I need to make this question here).

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closed as too broad by James K, Glorfindel, Jan Doggen, J. Chomel, Sir Cumference Apr 18 '18 at 22:25

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ It can be fun to write code that does simple astronomical calculations. But to do high quality accurate programs takes a lot of work and knowledge. Fortunately, there are great free astronomy software libraries available, so you don't have to write everything from scratch, but you still need to understand what you're doing. ;) $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Apr 17 '18 at 23:06
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    $\begingroup$ If you are young, you can start some astronomy study beside the CS. The astronomy worths much more, even if it is not a monetary worth. You will see it. $\endgroup$ – peterh Apr 17 '18 at 23:17
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    $\begingroup$ IMHO, a good starting point for someone who's doing computer science who wants to combine it with astronomy is to learn about the different kinds of time used in astronomy and how they're related to one another. Eg, sidereal time, mean solar time vs apparent solar time, etc. Also start learning about the celestial sphere and the various astronomical coordinate systems. True, this material can be a bit dry, and sometimes confusing, but you need a solid foundation if you want to get into astronomical computing. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Apr 17 '18 at 23:20
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    $\begingroup$ @DrChuck Computer Science $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Apr 18 '18 at 7:20
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not up on all the ins and outs, but can this be moved to meta rather than closed, or is there some sub-section where this can go? I hate to see a sincere question that people obviously want to answer, closed because it's not pure astronomy, though this one has answers, so a close wouldn't be so bad, but I think finding another area for questions like this would be better. $\endgroup$ – userLTK Apr 18 '18 at 18:37
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To me it sounds that you just want to expand your astronomical knowledge and are not actually looking for a career advice.

I would suggest to just start with reading popular science books. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_Evolution_(book) , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Brief_History_of_Time for example.

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Understanding how things work out in space is only half the fun; the other half is seeing them with your own eyes. Field guides by Pasachoff and others can help bring the two together. Magazines like Sky & Telescope offer information about temporarily observable objects like comets and cover science news at level between mass media and academic journals.

Hands-on observing experience can motivate programming projects in ways that textbooks can't. Given the free availability of such good software as Stellarium and JPL HORIZONS, and libraries like Astropy, it's wise not to spend much time reinventing wheels. On the other hand, implementing a few things yourself will expose you to various astronomy, math, algorithm, and data structure issues. You can always check your work against off-the-shelf tools, or better yet, against the real sky.

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If you want to know about stars, i.e., astronomy or astrophysics, Caroll & Ostlie is somewhat fundamental textbook for undergrad & grad.

If you want to know about galaxy and universe, i.e., cosmology, we use the textbook from Ryden.

My recommendation is to understand stars first, before you deal with galaxy, and then universe.

You will encounter a lot of physics stuff, which you might need to study separately out of just the concepts of astronomy or cosmology, if you want to have deep understanding of the topics.

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If you're like me and you just want lots of interesting facts about space without all of the academic level of complexity, you may enjoy watching the Crash Course Astronomy series. There are a lot of other good resources on YouTube, such as Deep Sky Videos or Deep Astronomy.

If you want something more fun and interactive, may I suggest playing Kerbal Space Program. I've learned a lot about how orbital mechanics, aerodynamics, and engineering just from playing this game. There is a question on the Space Exporation Stack Exchange that does a good job of covering how much can be learned from playing.

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