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The earliest life on Earth is thought to have began shortly after its formation (a few hundred million years after, by fossil evidence, and this while the late heavy bombardment was raging). With the next discernible leap (eukaryotes) happening billions of years later, That seems like a very short timeframe for life to spontaneously develop. Is it possible that life was seeded on an early Earth by a supernova of an earlier, life-bearing star, blasting living material across the cosmos?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Carl Witthoft, Glorfindel, Jan Doggen, Rory Alsop, Mike G Jul 5 '18 at 3:34

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Sounds unlikely but like all questions of this type ("Is X wild theory possible") it's not possible to give a definitive answer other than "can't absolutely rule it out". Can you provide a basis for saying "a few hundred million years ... That seems like a very short timeframe for life to spontaneously develop" ? $\endgroup$ – StephenG Jul 3 '18 at 1:43
  • $\begingroup$ sciencemag.org/news/2017/12/… $\endgroup$ – drone6502 Jul 3 '18 at 1:44
  • $\begingroup$ livescience.com/5426-life-survived-earth-early-bombardment.html $\endgroup$ – drone6502 Jul 3 '18 at 1:47
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    $\begingroup$ See K. Vonnegut, "The Big Space Fuck" $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jul 3 '18 at 15:43
  • $\begingroup$ The question asks: "could" and not "was". The answer is yes (there is no proof against), but no one knows it. We could talk about, if it is ontopic or not. $\endgroup$ – peterh Jul 3 '18 at 19:42
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It seems very unlikely because while a supernova which sheds enough mass int he explosion can scatter matter from the planets of its system into interstellar space, it also tends to irradiate that matter and to heat it to a very high temperature, so at least as far as a supernova's planets being the source of life, it's difficult to see how that might work.

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    $\begingroup$ There has been talk about impact events possibly spreading life to nearby planets. bbc.com/news/science-environment-25201572 Wondering if a supernova event could "graze" a nearby solar system and cause a similar ejection. Which might limit whatever radiation exposure to life bearing material. The earliest life forms were extremophiles. Living in the intense heat of a volcanic vent. Not strangers to abuse. $\endgroup$ – drone6502 Jul 3 '18 at 13:06
  • $\begingroup$ A simple near encounter with any star is a much better mechanism for that: Star wanders through Oort cloud; many comets formed; life-bearing planets heavily bombarded; life-bearing rocks thrown into space; life-bearing rocks land on another planet and seed it. But this mechanism seems much better at spreading life within a solar system that to other solar systems, since the hunks of rock ejected from the life-bearing planet would probably be sterilized before reaching another star. (It's hard enough to get the to the next planet without killing the onboard life.) $\endgroup$ – Mark Olson Jul 3 '18 at 13:18

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