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Can a Black Hole enter inside a Worm hole? If yes then what will a observer observe if it present at the another side of Worm hole?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by StephenG, Mike G, Glorfindel, J. Chomel, Jan Doggen Jul 23 '18 at 18:18

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    $\begingroup$ Not your question is unclear, but the answer. I think it will depend mainly on the sizes. $\endgroup$ – peterh Jul 21 '18 at 19:06
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Wormholes are a theoretical solution to Einstein's equations, but, unlike black holes, they have never been observed and probably don't exist.

If they did exist, they would almost immediately close due to the presence of matter in them. To stop them from closing you would need some "exotic matter" with remarkable properties, like "negative mass". Exotic matter has never been observed, and probably doesn't exist.

Trying to push something massive, like a black hole close to a wormhole would almost certainly cause the wormhole to close. Perhaps if the wormhole were sufficiently big with enough negative mass to stabalise it it would be possible for the black hole to traverse it. The black hole would pass through the worm hole just like anything else. At the other end you would see the black hole coming through the wormhole.

But remember, fundamentally, wormholes don't exist.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think claiming wormholes don't exist with that certainty is a bit premature. Very unlikely, yes. Extremely unlikely to be natural, yes. But we do not have a strong reason to rule them out. $\endgroup$ – Anders Sandberg Jul 21 '18 at 20:11
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    $\begingroup$ I said "probably don't exist". If you prefer "Are very unlikely to exist" or "extremely unlikely to be natural" that's fine. The basic point is that these are theoretical objects, not based on observation. The strong reason we have to rule them out is the requirement either for exotic matter or for some significant changes to GR to keep them open. $\endgroup$ – James K Jul 21 '18 at 22:03
  • $\begingroup$ Some prople have written research to demonstrate that a singularity is a dougnut/ring shape and in the middle of the ring is a worm hole. I think all theories inside black holes are pseudoscience, regarding quantum geometry and density of the singularity. We presume it conserves angular momentum and shrinks to an unknown size. I think that probabalistic density increases inside dense places like big stars, so i think bhs create timespace, because timespace is a probabalistically dense construct. $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Jul 26 '18 at 12:13

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