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I remember reading an old astronomy book mentioning a certain planet and the main point of interest was that this planet has or may have polar ice caps but of acid. I can't remember the name though, what planet or planets fit this description?

Now there some very strange worlds out there though I'm unsure whether this one may or may not be all that strange. Is this something of an oddity or is a planet containing frozen acid not that uncommon?

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    $\begingroup$ Does carbonic acid count? If so, check out the composition of Mars's polar caps. OTOH, I guess it's a bit of a stretch calling a mixture of watwr ice and carbon dioxide ice acidic. ;) $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Sep 10 '18 at 10:32
  • $\begingroup$ One could imagine a very volcanic terrestrial planet with plenty of sulphuric acid (like Venus). If it cools down you might get frozen sulphuric acid icecaps (or more likely, acidic ice sheets). $\endgroup$ – Anders Sandberg Sep 10 '18 at 16:03
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Of the planets, two have ice caps: Earth and Mars. The Earth's ice caps are water ice, and Mars has ice caps of Carbon dioxide, and some Water ice. The CO2 on Mars would give a weakly acidic solution if melted but it would not be a caustic acid.

Titan has hydrocarbon lakes at its poles, and other planets are too hot, or are uniformly frozen.

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  • $\begingroup$ I hesitated to mention remembering it to be Mars. Yes, i'm absolutely sure it was Mars. It was a very old picture book and most likely exaggerated this little factoid. $\endgroup$ – mr.eaver Nov 25 '18 at 13:29

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