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Blood Moon Jul 2018

I don't undertand why the moon can be that big a few hundred miles sout of where I am in London...

And when I went to Greece, even Africa, the moon wasn't so large...

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    $\begingroup$ It's a zoomed-in picture on the fotographing person standing far away from the Acropolis. $\endgroup$ – AtmosphericPrisonEscape Oct 29 '18 at 18:09
  • $\begingroup$ wow - 2 downvotes...and no close votes... $\endgroup$ – Our Man in Bananas Oct 30 '18 at 9:46
  • $\begingroup$ Using your zoom lens - "zoom in" as far as it will go. You can take an identical picture. $\endgroup$ – Fattie Oct 31 '18 at 13:14
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The moon is the same size in Athens as in London.

To take a photo like that you go a long way from the Greek temple, so the temple appears to be smaller than your little-fingernail with your arm stretched out. You then get a powerful telephoto lens to zoom in and wait for the moon to rise. If you have done your calculations correctly you have positioned yourself so that the moon appears right behind the temple. If you were standing there, the moon and the temple would both be small and the temple would be in the distance.

If it is the temple of Poseidon, which is about 10m along the side, we can estimate that the photographer must have been standing about 1km away to get this shot, perhaps standing by the road across the bay

You can get similar photos in London. You just need a viewpoint from which you can see the buildings of the city and is in the right position (direction and distance) for the moon to rise (or set) in just the right place. Michael Tomas captured such a picture.

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  • $\begingroup$ Which temple is it? I thought Parthenon, but that is bigger and more intact. $\endgroup$ – James K Oct 29 '18 at 19:50
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    $\begingroup$ James K - I think it might be the Temple of Poseidon at Sounion. $\endgroup$ – Dr Chuck Oct 29 '18 at 20:09
  • $\begingroup$ @JamesK: Thank you for this... $\endgroup$ – Our Man in Bananas Oct 29 '18 at 20:58

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