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I'm a math undergrad, but I'm really interested in learning positional astronomy; However, the only well-referenced textbook I've come up with is Spherical Astronomy by W. M. Smart.

I would like to understand how suitable it is today. I have the 6th edition which seems to be the latest, but which was issued back in 1977. I know that a relatively old math text book, for example Apostol's Calculus (published in the 60's, if I'm not wrong), won't present too much trouble, but I'm a newcomer to astronomy, so I don't know if a book printed in 1977 is "up to date".

Given the case that there are better or more up-to-date books, are there other recommended texts for me to read as well or is this one a good choice?

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    $\begingroup$ Do you mean Spherical Astronomy by W.M. Smart (from this comment) or are you talking about a different book? Or perhaps Positional Astronomy by D. McNally? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 8 '18 at 5:58
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    $\begingroup$ Exactly, but that seems to be the fourth edition, I have the sixth one. That's the only detail. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Bonilla Jaramillo Nov 8 '18 at 6:02
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    $\begingroup$ Spherical trig has not changed since 1977. $\endgroup$ – Rob Jeffries Nov 8 '18 at 9:57
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    $\begingroup$ There is another book called Spherical Astronomy, by Robin M Green. Green updated Smart's book (the 6th edition, 1977) and then wrote his own text. I haven't read it, but it appears more modern in style, although as noted above the subject hasn't changed 1977, albeit the ready availability of computational power has made life easier. $\endgroup$ – Dr Chuck Nov 8 '18 at 11:15
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    $\begingroup$ @DrChuck I'll try to find a copy locally. Some chapters are viewable here: books.google.com/books/about/… $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 8 '18 at 18:10

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