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Guys what is that moon like thing inside the halo?enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Lens artifact; the light is bouncing around in your lenses $\endgroup$ – user1569 Nov 9 '18 at 10:04
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about astronomy, it may fit on either physics or photography. $\endgroup$ – gerrit Nov 9 '18 at 10:07
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    $\begingroup$ @gerrit the question is certainly about astrophotography, and there is a tag for that. But in this case the ring is an atmospheric effect and so would better belong in Earth Science SE if that were the topic of the question. However, the off-center "Moon-like" dot definitely/probably lens flare. Anyway I think the OP should feel welcome to ask questions about unusual things in the sky and someone should say that in first person... $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 9 '18 at 10:36
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    $\begingroup$ @makanakamutasa Welcome to Stack Exchange! There are almost 200 different sites to choose from. I have a hunch that Earth Science Stack Exchange would have been better for your question since the ring is happening in Earth's atmosphere, not in outer space. You wouldn't have known that, it's taken me a long time to get used to so many sites. Don't worry if your question is closed. It doesn't mean it's a bad question, but only that it is not a good fit for this particular SE site. That white dot certainly seems to be just lens flare and that can... $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 9 '18 at 10:38
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    $\begingroup$ @makanakamutasa (cont.) have all kinds of different shapes. It would explain why you don't see it without your camera (please don't look at the Sun!) and if you'd taken two pictures pointed at slightly different directions, the dot would move very differently than the Sun did. In fact, you could take another picture of the Sun on another clear day with the same camera and prove to your self it still happens. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 9 '18 at 10:42
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It's a lens flare, caused by scattered sunlight within the camera's lens system. It looks very much like one of the examples on the Wikipedia page:

By Hustvedt - Own work

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