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Why is the expansion of the universe allowed to faster than light if everything that moves within a vacuum can't reach the speed limit of light?

I've read that astronomers looked at the distance between galaxies but I'm still not understanding what's going on. If objects in the universe can't go faster than the speed of light in a vacuum, how are galaxies (which objects within the universe) moving away from each other faster than light?

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You are not allowed to move faster than c in sense of classical motion that is velocity can't be greater than c but ,universe is expanding not because objects are moving away but new space time is being created between them which increases distance between them and that can happen such that expansion is faster than c , there is no violation of theory of relativity. I hope that's clear

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    $\begingroup$ It's not that "new space time is being created between them", it's because the metric of existing spacetime is expanding. $\endgroup$ – Chappo Says Reinstate Monica Nov 15 '18 at 12:49
  • $\begingroup$ I think that's up to interpretation, @Chappo. $\endgroup$ – pela Nov 15 '18 at 19:45

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