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There are many TV shows such as "How the Universe Works" that explain theories about the origin of the universe such as the Big-Bang Theory.

What resources can I access to verify the scientific thinking on the origin of the universe theories presented on such TV shows?

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    $\begingroup$ This isn't a question about Astronomy really. You can use Stack Exchange to ask specific questions on specific topics. But I think you'll have difficulty with "verify current thinking" in most sites. "Current thinking" is pretty broad, and "verify thinking" is subjective. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 14 at 7:23
  • $\begingroup$ Modern "big science" experiments can't be verified by ordinary people alone. For example, the Kepler exoplanet survey required the launch and ongoing operation and processing of data from a dedicated satellite - it's not something anyone alone can directly verify. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Feb 14 at 11:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Joe Bigler do you mean theories like the big bang? Perhaps if so, then I can edit the question to make it better. If I changed the meaning in any way, just re-edit it back. $\endgroup$ – Max0815 Feb 24 at 21:41
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    $\begingroup$ @Max0815 That is exactly what I meant. I appreciate the help. The big bang comes up a lot and I would really like to know if there generally accepted think is. Go ahead with the rewrite. $\endgroup$ – Joe Bigler Apr 11 at 3:07
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Use other, more scientific sources.

You have no way to test them by some home measurements - science was tuned to pass even more sophisticated tests.

Popular media is often not very exact. They try to open the results to the public. For example, to find the geometry of the Kerr Black Holes was a decade long work for the best mathematicians of the time. The result is a relative simple formula, which is understable with not far more than high school math. Most in the popular media about the wormholes and white holes is based on it, or at least strongly related to it.

So, to check it, best if you try to find the formula and try to learn, what does it mean. It still doesn't need to understand the decade long work behind that, and also this is amazing - but only after you've understood it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Feb 28 at 3:09

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