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Is there any reason to think a Trans-Neptunian dwarf planet, the size of Pluto, could not exist in a Keplerian orbit 120AU from the Sun?

If such an object existed, and came within 0.1AU of the heliopause, is there anything about the environment near the heliopause that would prevent a stable orbit.

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    $\begingroup$ When you say “exist”, do you mean in orbit or just passing by? Is there a reason you’re so precise about proximity to the heliopause? What definition of Dwarf Planet are you using? It might be worthwhile if you edit your question to add some detail. :-) $\endgroup$ – Chappo Hasn't Forgotten Monica May 29 '19 at 1:21
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    $\begingroup$ The reason for your question doesn't make it invalid here, but the lack of clarity might. To make it a fitting question for our site, why not be more direct and ask whether the nature of the heliopause makes a stable orbit impossible, and if not impossible, is it plausible that a large body like Pluto could form that far out. $\endgroup$ – Chappo Hasn't Forgotten Monica May 29 '19 at 1:46
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    $\begingroup$ There is a [reality-check] tag in worldbuilding that you use to stipulate that you want answers on whether or not something could exist/function in real life. There are some very knowledgeable people on worldbuilding, and the userbase sees much overlap with physics/astronomy/maths etc. So yeah, worldbuilding is very much the place. $\endgroup$ – Ingolifs May 30 '19 at 1:03
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    $\begingroup$ @mistertribs that sounds a little bit like punitive closing. The OP is probably asking in good faith. I think the question and the answer can both be refined a little bit without any need to close it down. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 2 '19 at 15:34
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    $\begingroup$ @mistertribs Reading the question; it looks perfectly clear to me. Talk about what is or isn't "in another users head" is unproductive and incompatible with Stack Exchange. I think your answer is quite helpful and I'm the one who up voted it. I think the thing about being within 0.1 or 0.01 AU is overblown. Not everyone who asks a question about the heliopause comes in with knowledge of its exact shape. I don't think it's "grounds for closure" but instead it's an opportunity for learning. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 2 '19 at 22:29
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Heliopause is believed to be at a distance of about 123 AU away from the Sun. Now, if you look at the list of farthest body in the solar system, you will see two bodies located approximately at that distance: 2018 VG18 and predicted FarFarOut (124.12 AU and ~140 AU from the sun as of June 2020 respectively). They are considered the farthest TNOs in the solar system.

For comparison, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are the two space probes which left the solar system is now 149.36 AU and 124 AU from the sun as of June 2020. Also you can see some of the near-parabolic comets originating from that distance.

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