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How do planets still orbit around the empty space where a black hole was after a black hole absorbs the milky way's black hole and keeps moving through space without disturbing surrounding planets that were orbiting that black hole?

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  • $\begingroup$ This would be on topic on Astronomy, but is currently unclear. Please clarify what you mean by "black hole takes it". $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 20 '19 at 13:17
  • $\begingroup$ I recently edited the question. $\endgroup$ – jehovahsays Jun 20 '19 at 14:48
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    $\begingroup$ Is that a hypothetical scenario or is this an actual situation you read about? Something's still not clear about it. If you have a source that talks about this, please link to or quote from it. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 20 '19 at 15:01
  • $\begingroup$ Here is what I currently understand from this question: If one black hole passed through a black-hole-centered system and absorbed the black hole without disturbing the planets (not possible) and kept moving on, how would the planets still orbit the central space? The answer is that they wouldn't, but I suspect something is still lost in communication here. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 20 '19 at 15:05
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    $\begingroup$ You mention the Milky Way's black hole, by which I think you mean to refer to the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. If that were removed, the galaxy would continue to rotate, but that's because it is not gravitationally bound by the supermassive black hole in the first place. The supermassive black hole is not massive enough to hold the whole galaxy together--the galaxy is held together under its own mass. Outer systems orbit the mass of the center systems, not of the black hole alone. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 20 '19 at 15:06
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The short answer is that they don't. If an even larger SMBH passed through the centre of the Milky Way and "swept up" the existing SMBH, all the stars and planets that are close to it (within a few tens of light-years, maybe more) would experience huge disruption and might end up orbiting the new black hole and being carried away, or flying free, or whatever.

The stars and planets much further away, which make up the bulk of the Milky Way wouldn't be much disturbed, because they are held in their orbits by their gravitational attraction for each other, and for the dark matter halo which suffuses the galaxy and only a small contribution comes from the gravity of the SMBH.

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