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Using our solar system's heliosphere as an analagy to what is happening in our galaxy and even the universe as a whole, can light redshift with changes in quantum fields?

The universe is constantly being bombarded by particles from stars, pulsars, quasars, black holes, etc.. Is it possible for these particles to interact with photons in a way that will cause light to redshift?

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  • $\begingroup$ What is the "density of a quantum field" ? $\endgroup$ – Fattie Oct 24 '19 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ Your question is unclear. Please clarify whether you are asking about whether such effects can explain cosmological redshift (which they can't) or whether there are observable effects (both redshifts and blueshifts) in some sources in certain circumstances (which there are). $\endgroup$ – Rob Jeffries Oct 24 '19 at 22:43
  • $\begingroup$ Fattie; by Density I am talking about the fluxuations in number of and geometric locations of quantum particles (i.e. Quarks, electrons, protons, etc), and their individual energy levels, i.e. velocity, vector, temperature, spin, etc.) . I dont know the correct way to describe this so term was the first that came to mind. I suppose the better way to articulate the question is "Can a change in the properties of quantum fields of (fields of electrons, quarks, protons, muons,etc.) affect redshift of light? $\endgroup$ – Richard Oct 25 '19 at 0:44
  • $\begingroup$ I appreciate your patience. The better way to ask is can the change of the properties of quantum fields located in interstellar and intergalactic space interact with and cause photons to redshift? Their was a lot of research into "Tired Light" in the 1920s and mainstream astronomers and physicists of the day mostly agreed that the Hubble constant is not a result of "Tired Light" - But movement of light towards or away from the observer. $\endgroup$ – Richard Oct 25 '19 at 0:55
  • $\begingroup$ Specifically, I am wondering if the discoveries of quantum fields and new particles would advance this disproven notion that Light can interact with a field quantum particles (like lets say a field of electrons or muons or nutrons moving in the opposite direction of the photon); in a way that will expand its wave length? $\endgroup$ – Richard Oct 25 '19 at 0:55
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No.

Or at least such an effect has never been observed, neither in the locality of the Earth or in light detected from distant sources.

If a photon has an interaction with a quantum field (such as an electromagnetic field) this causes a scattering. Scattering would cause a blurring and dimming of distant sources. This is not observed.

Such an effect, if it existed, should also be present on more local scales. But there is no redshift related to distance within our galaxy. Nor is there any evidence of any shift, even tiny, in the photons emitted by other local sources

Thus such a proposal would require an unknown interaction of light, that causes no scattering, only affects light from outside the local group of galaxies, but is otherwise linear with distance. And one would have to explain such phenomena as the slowing of time in distant galaxies, (which an expanding universe model understands as the relativistic time dilation)

So in short: No, a change in the density of interstellar and intergalactic quantum fields does not cause the observed red-shift of photons.

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    $\begingroup$ Technically large scale variations in the general density of mass and energy do have a small effect on red-shift over great distances due to interaction with the expansion of the universe. arxiv.org/abs/1611.04504 . This is nitpicking though, and the effect is tiny. $\endgroup$ – Steve Linton Oct 24 '19 at 10:39
  • $\begingroup$ @SteveLinton it may be tiny, but it is certainly measurable. This answer should at least be discussing the Compton and inverse Compton effects, which do change the wavelengths of photons that are received from various astronomical sources. The question doesn't ask whether such effects can explain Hubble's law. Comptonisation and inverse Comptonisation is observed in galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources and Comptonisation of the CMB is observed in the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect. $\endgroup$ – Rob Jeffries Oct 24 '19 at 17:38
  • $\begingroup$ Casimir effect may alter speed of light, but I've never seen a good demonstration of this. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_effect $\endgroup$ – Wayfaring Stranger Oct 24 '19 at 17:52
  • $\begingroup$ @RobJeffries It sort of does discuss compton effects, which are a form of scattering. Compton scattering can cause photons to lose energy. But the question asks about "redshifting" and compton scattering is wavelength dependent and does also change direction, not only wavelength. and te sunyave zel;dovich is a "blue shifting". I thinkt the implication of the question is clear, even if not explict. This question is about "tired light". and the answer is still no. $\endgroup$ – James K Oct 24 '19 at 20:33
  • $\begingroup$ @RobJeffries It sort of does discuss compton effects, which are a form of scattering. Compton scattering can cause photons to lose energy. But the question asks about "redshifting" and compton scattering is wavelength dependent and does also change direction, not only wavelength. and te sunyave zel;dovich is a "blue shifting". I thinkt the implication of the question is clear, even if not explict. This question is about "tired light". and the answer is still no. $\endgroup$ – James K Oct 24 '19 at 20:33

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