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Hot Jupiters are giant planets that are very close to their host star. How many Hot Jupiter exoplanets have been found around stars more massive than our Sun?

Has the number of Hot Jupiters discovered as a function of host star mass been plotted? Say $x$ Hot Jupiters around stars that are 1 to 1.5 solar masses ; $y$ Hot Jupiters around stars that are 1.5 to 2 solar masses,...

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Yes, there are hot Jupiters around stars more massive than the Sun: in fact the first known hot Jupiter host star 51 Pegasi has a mass of around 1.11 solar masses.

As for a list of them: use the confirmed planets table at the NASA Exoplanet Archive. You just need to add in the relevant criteria you're interested in. The actual criteria for where to draw the dividing line seems to be roughly around Saturn-mass planets, so using Saturn's properties you could do the following:

  • Filter by mass of planet > 0.3 Jupiters, orbital period < 10 days, mass of star > 1 solar mass. At the time of writing this selects 275 planets.

  • Filter by radius of planet > 0.8 Jupiters, orbital period < 10 days, mass of star > 1 solar mass. This gets me 286 planets at the time of writing.

There is a handy "Plot Table" button that will allow you to construct a histogram from the selected planets. Here's an example from the planets selected by mass between 1 and 5 solar masses (there are a few outliers at even higher stellar masses, but I'm not sure how reliable those mass estimates are):

Histogram of mass-selected hot Jupiters orbiting stars between 1 and 5 solar masses.

Note that the above does not represent the actual distribution of hot Jupiters with stellar mass: there are detection biases at play that make it harder to find planets around more massive stars, which need to be corrected for to estimate the true distribution.

You can also do similar queries at the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia but the user interface isn't quite as friendly.

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    $\begingroup$ Nice job, I was starting out with the Plot Table function at the Exoplanet Archive also but got pulled off to do other things... $\endgroup$ – astrosnapper Nov 18 at 20:18

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