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For example, if there was an object somewhere in the room, say 100 light years away, which would have to be very large and have the surface of a mirror, you could theoretically point the telescope at it and you would see the earth as it is was back then. Of course you would have to do all the details for years, the telescope would have to be much stronger and bigger, and something like this would have to exist and be discovered, but theoretically it could work that way. Your opinions would interest me very much! Thank you

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't really think this is a question ... such a discussion where one asks for opinions can be done in chat I think, the QA site is not meant for opinion based questions $\endgroup$ – Tosic Dec 25 '19 at 13:07
  • $\begingroup$ I always thought of it as an alien race with powerful observing equipment recording the Earth-- when we meet them, we can see our own history. However, it's difficult (for us) to see Earth details from the Moon, and we can barely detect exoplanets at all, and only large ones at that. I'm not sure it's possible to create technology that could accurately record Earth (and only the part of the Earth facing them) to any degree of accuracy that far away. There's a Twilight Zone episode where aliens beam back their version of "I Love Lucy" to us, but it's pretty much pure science fiction $\endgroup$ – barrycarter Dec 25 '19 at 14:54
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though the discovery of such a polished large body is odd, even if it is there it would not be much useful because it will then show us the historic times of 19th century which archaeologists themselves can easily discover using evidences.

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  • $\begingroup$ But what if it's 1000 light years away? 10,000? 1 million? $\endgroup$ – barrycarter Dec 25 '19 at 14:51
  • $\begingroup$ we can see what theorists have already predicted taking into account the evidences $\endgroup$ – Harsh Sarkar Dec 27 '19 at 2:38
  • $\begingroup$ Right, but the further back we go, the less accurate the predictions are. Plus, theorists may have it totally wrong $\endgroup$ – barrycarter Dec 27 '19 at 2:57

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