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I have always wondered how Jupiter and the other gas giants worked when it came to having a core(If they have one). Would it be rocky or liquid, or can it be a gas. Every time I have asked this question to my teachers I have never gotten an exact answer.

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    $\begingroup$ Deep inside a gas giant there can't be normal gas because the pressure (and hence the density) is far too high, so instead you get a supercritical fluid. Obviously, it's technically impractical to directly observe the core of any planet, but as usernumber's answer states we have good reason to believe that gas giants have rocky & metallic elements in their cores. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Feb 1, 2020 at 3:08

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Gas giants are believed to have a solid core. They first formed as icy planets, and were heavy enough to accrete hydrogen and helium from the protoplanetary cloud they were in.

Saturn, for instance, is thought to have a central dense core of 10 to 25 Earth masses that was probably the seed of the formation of the planet, before it accreted its hydrogen-helium envelope from the protosolar disk. (see link)

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