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Is there any difference in the gravity of the Earth for an Earth body or a celestial body? For example, will gravity be same for an Earth body, compared to the Moon?

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    $\begingroup$ The gravitational law is the same for all the celestial bodies. To a good approximation, most celestial bodies can be described by Newton's universal law of gravitation. General relativity plays a role for more exotic objects. $\endgroup$ – AtmosphericPrisonEscape May 27 at 16:04
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    $\begingroup$ I have a couple of counter-questions: What is an Earth body? Do you mean an object on Earth? Why do you think there might be a difference in the gravity between whatever an Earth body is, and a celestial body? $\endgroup$ – Jim421616 May 27 at 23:13
  • $\begingroup$ When you travel from earth towards the moon after a certain distance(of course out of the atmosphere), you will not feel any gravity and you will float in-universe. However, the moon is still at the same place due to earths gravity and tidal effects. $\endgroup$ – JiteshNK May 28 at 8:40
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Gravity is the same qualitatively. It is the same type of thing: It pulls you down. It can be described by Einstein's equations. It can be very closely approximated my Newton's equations. Force of gravity is proportional to mass and and inversely proportional to distance²

Newton proposed a law of Universal gravity. The same law of gravity applies everywhere. Although the details of what the law actually is have been tweaked (by Einstein) the principle of "the same law everywhere and at all times" seems to be true.

Gravity is different quantitatively. It is stronger in some places and weaker in others. The moon has a much smaller mass, and so your weight on the moon (ie the force of gravity on you) would be much less.

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