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I am new to Astronomy and never had a binocular to look at the sky, I read somewhere that already with a 30x optical zoom should be possible to spot Saturn and see its rings, is that true?

I have a budget of up to 400 bucks, which binocular would be the best in this range to see Saturn and other objects in the night sky?

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In your choice, you should also consider the binocular stand, your experience and how good your sight is. Also, with that money, you can also buy this telescope. With it, you can also see all the Messier objects. I have SkyWatcher 10 ", and I am quite satisfied with it. For cheap, but good telescopes, look at this site.

I haven't quite answered your question, but I think, that this will open more options.

Also, as @Mick has mentioned, this question is quite similar to yours, but you've said how to see Saturn and other objects in the night sky, so I searched for a link for these other objects. If I'd have 400 bucks, then I'll definitely go for a telescope.

Hope this helps!

P.S. Try to buy as fast as you can because Saturn can be seen earlier and earlier in the evening. Now (middle of Juny 2020) it is observable at approximately 00:00—morning, but soon, it will be observable at 21:00!

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  • $\begingroup$ Also, when buying the scope, I wouldn't go for a computerised mount. Searching for dim objects and happiness while looking at the result has more charm than just viewing them. $\endgroup$
    – User123
    Jun 18 '20 at 15:54
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Saturn is pretty small; to see the rings, you need the sort of magnification that requires mounted rather than hand-held binoculars (20x +). At 20x, you should be able to see rings but they will be tiny. Ideally, you want binoculars with interchangeable eyepieces so you can use different magnifications for different objects (of course, then you'll have to buy eyepieces in pairs). As the comments on your question pointed out, a monocular telescope with a mounting will generally be much cheaper than the equivalent astronomical binoculars. If you get binoculars, make sure you get an astronomy-focused tripod like this: https://www.amazon.com/Celestron-93607-Heavy-Duty-Altazimuth-Tripod/dp/B0007UQNY0/ rather than a cheap photo tripod.

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  • $\begingroup$ I have a 20x80 binocular (which is quite huge). I can spot Saturn's rings easily. They indeed look tiny even when Saturn is close, but I can see them. The thing is that I can't see the gap between the rings and the planet, I just see an eliptical source of light. This is because the glare of Saturn and the rings makes it difficult to see, but yeah it is possible. On the other hand, these binoculars are not common, they are huge, and you will need a tripod for them, to be able to notice anything as particular as this. $\endgroup$
    – Swike
    Jun 17 '20 at 22:24
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Observing the planets and using binoculars for astronomy applications, you need to look at magnification at least 20 and lens diameter of 50 and above. Because of the high magnification, you'll need to mount your binoculars onto a tripod to have a steady image. Even with all of that, the image might be too dark and the image may not be magnified enough.

That's why I'd recommend looking into beginner telescopes. I think this article could serve you well. It's basically a buying guide for telescopes as a gift for kids, but mainly is aimed at beginners, such as yourself.

Manual Altazimuth Mount Telescopes is what you should be looking at. These are the best choices for beginners, as the telescope has only two motions: vertical (altitude) and horizontal (azimuth). That makes the moving of a telescope much easier.

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  • $\begingroup$ The image might be too dark? Even with the naked eye, you can see the image pretty bright. But I agree with you about magnification. $\endgroup$
    – User123
    Jun 18 '20 at 15:52

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