5
$\begingroup$

I'm looking for the total mass of the moons in the solar system in Earth Mass this would be include the 67's moons of jupiter, the 62's of saturn, the 27's Uranus and the 14's for Neptune.

it's a crazy question I know, if you have some list of the object with mass in same range i can make the addition ^^

$\endgroup$
4
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Why -1? Jeez, people, this is hysteria. $\endgroup$
    – Py-ser
    Jun 18, 2014 at 1:54
  • $\begingroup$ I think "solar" is the wrong term here. $\endgroup$ Jun 18, 2014 at 2:02
  • $\begingroup$ You can edit the question, or propose an edit, and this will improve the quality. $\endgroup$
    – Py-ser
    Jun 18, 2014 at 2:22
  • $\begingroup$ I like this question -- it might come up in discussions on limits to growth. How much resources are available in our solar system? Possible resource bodies might include all the moons, the asteroids, and KBOs. A +1 from me. $\endgroup$
    – HopDavid
    Jun 18, 2014 at 12:34

2 Answers 2

6
$\begingroup$

Here you can find a list of all the natural satellites in our Solar System. You can check one by one (good luck!) OR you can check this webpage, and just add the terms.

Please, keep in mind that the latter website is kind of unknown, so double-check at least some of the masses, before to trust it.

Perhaps, you can cross check with this list as well, and see if other parameters (size, distance, etc.) agree.

$\endgroup$
3
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Py-ser missed this page (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Solar_System_objects_by_size). It lists the object with the mass, so it is easier to get the information you want. BTW, you would only need to go down to about 200 km in size since the mass of such small objects would account to less than 0.1% of the total. $\endgroup$
    – LDC3
    Jun 18, 2014 at 4:24
  • $\begingroup$ Definitely the better way to do it! Thanks $\endgroup$
    – Py-ser
    Jun 18, 2014 at 5:52
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ The page LDC3 links to has a pie chart. Luna plus Io form close to a 90º wedge or quarter slice. So I'd guesstimate 4 * (8.9e22 + 7.3e22) kg. That comes to about 6.5e23 kg. The earth is about 6e24 kg. So it looks the moons total a little more than a tenth earth mass. $\endgroup$
    – HopDavid
    Jun 18, 2014 at 12:21
5
$\begingroup$

Really not sure why this question still hasn't been answered, as it is very intriguing.

Adding up the masses of all 19 rounded moons* from Ganymede to Mimas as listed by this Wikipedia page, the total mass comes out to $639.10239 \times 10^{21} \text{kg}$, which is just under Mars' mass of $641.7 \times 10^{21} \text{kg}$.

The margin of error for the moons' masses likely pushes this figure up, so it's fair to say the total mass of the moons in the Solar System is about the mass of Mars, and leave it at that.

Here's a pie chart showing the relative share of each moon's mass to the total value; the Galilean moons make up $61\%$ of the total mass, and adding Titan, Triton, and the Moon to the mix pushes the figure up to over $95\%$.

enter image description here

*The masses of the non-rounded moons are more or less negligible, and the moons of dwarf planets other than Pluto (e.g. Dysnomia) weren't taken into account as their mass is highly uncertain.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .