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How did matter come to be?
Why is there matter if matter and antimatter cancel each other?

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    $\begingroup$ Very big, potentially very broad question. Have you done any prior research. The fact that you ask about matter and antimatter cancelling out suggests that you have. Please include all the prior research, even if it is just wikipedia and other forum posts. If not, I think this is too broad (There are several nobel prizes to be won for answering this question!) $\endgroup$ – James K Jul 27 at 18:22
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    $\begingroup$ Antimatter and matter differ a very little bit. This tiny difference caused more normal matter to survive in the very early Universe. After the expansion, this is what we are now. $\endgroup$ – peterh - Reinstate Monica Jul 27 at 18:34
  • $\begingroup$ This is really more physics than astronomy, though it might fit here too. There's also a lot written about this subject because it's such a fundamental question of very early cosmology. That said, I don't believe the answer is known. It's being studied and various hypothesis have been suggested. A google search "why more matter than antimatter" will provide no shortage of articles and a few different answers, many of them written for the casual hobbyist. But I'm pretty sure that a consensus answer to this remains unresolved. $\endgroup$ – userLTK Jul 27 at 22:17
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    $\begingroup$ See the wiki article on Baryon asymmetry, in particular the conditions that Andrei Sakharov showed would suffice to explain an asymmetry in the amount of matter/antimatter in the early universe. $\endgroup$ – Hypnosifl Jul 27 at 22:53
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Actually, I also believe that before anything should have come into existence nothing should have been in existence. So everything should have got created out of nothing as we get +ve numbers and -ve numbers from zero as follows. 0 => + 4 - 4 or 0 => +5 - 3 - 2 Wherein, the +ve numbers represent the matter and the -ve numbers represent antimatter. Of course though splitting of zero can be explained but how we explain it in physics is an unresolved mystery.

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    $\begingroup$ Not sure this qualifies as a scientific answer. However I'm not even sure this has a scientific answer, but rather a philosophical one - in which case you already come closer again. $\endgroup$ – planetmaker Jul 28 at 15:06
  • $\begingroup$ In these terms, it should be 0=4-4 because matter and antimatter fuse together and annihilation happens. But what actually happened is 0=5-4 which doesn't make sense, also, I don't think zero should be considered, because something came out of nothing and having a 0 might not be the right interpretation of that situation. Nevertheless, it remains a mystery. $\endgroup$ – raptorAcrylyc Jul 29 at 1:52

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