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Eugene Shoemaker was an esteemed and celebrated astronomer and planetary geologist. Is it possible to localize their final resting place with a latitude, longitude and feature name?

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    $\begingroup$ I've linked to this question here, hopefully it can be answered soon! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 2 '20 at 17:52
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    $\begingroup$ Pretty certain they crashed the Lunar Prospector into the Shoemaker Crater. Is that accurate enough? $\endgroup$ – Rory Alsop Sep 2 '20 at 18:33
  • $\begingroup$ @RoryAlsop you're welcome to post that as an answer with the lat/lon of the crater's center, but there might be more detailed information available on Prospector's final trajectory. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 2 '20 at 18:53
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A small portion of Eugene Shoemaker's ashes were placed on the Lunar Prospector mission. After completion of the mission's primary objectives:

Lunar Prospector was deliberately impacted onto the shadowed Shoemaker crater on the lunar surface at 09:52:02 UT July 31, 1999.
NASA Mission Description

No coordinates are given in that source, however, the Google Earth rendering of the Moon has a placemark for the crash site. No coordinates are listed.
A source from before the impact occurred lists the planned crash site as 87.70 S 42.0 E, which is very close to the placemark, and gives an estimated crash time within a minute of the actual event.

Thus, the likely resting place of that portion of Shoemaker's ashes may be gives as: 87.70S 42.0E, Shoemaker Crater.

Note: The idea of crashing into the crater was put forth by the University of Texas at Austin, and they had a small site about the crash. I was able to find a snapshot from the period that has working links on the Internet Archive here.
There was also an entire site devoted to the amateur astronomy aspect of the crash, also on the Internet Archive: lunarimpact.com.
Information from these sites indicates that the reason the crash time was different was due to a stronger-than-expected deorbit burn, and thus the actual crash site might be closer to 87.7S, 42.1E, which is exactly where the Google Earth marker is. The last mission report, however, lists it as 87.7S 42E.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the speedy answer! Following your 2nd link I found this and this (open access) $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 2 '20 at 19:10
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    $\begingroup$ Excellent! I was actually working through the internet archive, trying to get to the right snapshot. I'll add my links into the answer as well. $\endgroup$ – IronEagle Sep 2 '20 at 19:20

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