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enter image description here

This question is not about whether it makes sense to have a centre of the universe or not instead, it's about the inflation graph we used to see while describing the Big Bang. From the inflation graph (drawn above), it's clear that the universe is supposed to have a centre at somewhere around "The yellow point". Still why do we say that the universe has no centre or universe has it's centre at each point of it.

What's the problem with the figure or my understanding?

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That diagram does not depict the entire universe. At most, it depicts the history of what is now our observable universe (specifically, a 2D slice through it), with us at the center only because we're observing it. Someone at the furthest reaches of that portion of the universe would see us at the furthest reaches of their observable universe, and themselves at the center.

And like us, they would observe the universe to be expanding away from them, and doing so equally in all directions. This, as far as we can determine, is true for anywhere within the observable universe. The simplest assumption is that it continues to do so outside it as well, and there is no evidence that it does anything else.

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    $\begingroup$ Upvoted. I would add the observable universe is even just a slice of it, in the diagram. By experience, many neglect that one axis is time otherwise we would need concentric spheres. $\endgroup$
    – Alchimista
    Oct 5 '20 at 10:41
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the expansion of the universe is relative to where it is being observed from. Much like dots on a balloon. Its easy to point to the center of the balloon (like what the picture shows) because it is only a 3d object. But for higher dimensions we don't have the spacial awareness to understand where than center of the universe is (if there even is one)

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    $\begingroup$ The Universe (meaning all of space) is also "only" a 3D object. Spacetime is 4D; space is 3D. $\endgroup$
    – D. Halsey
    Oct 5 '20 at 21:16
  • $\begingroup$ Well planets curving space time bend 3d space into 4d, and its plausible that the universe exists in a higher order of dimensions (like if we travel indefinitely in one direction we will come back to the starting point, much like a 2d figure would on a spherical object $\endgroup$
    – jrima12
    Oct 6 '20 at 2:08

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