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I was roaming on my terrace and I saw star-like moving object that gradually became small, red colour and disappear. Within a few minutes I saw another similar-looking object a little distance away coming from opposite of first one and disappearing with red colour at nearly the same location. Within 5-6 minutes, I saw another similar object that soon disappeared. The object was moving from a lower altitude to a higher one. What was it?

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You may have seen some artificial satellites passing into the Earth's shadow. If so, Heavens-Above could help you identify them. The reddish color just before disappearance would be due to the atmosphere scattering shorter wavelengths of sunlight.

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    $\begingroup$ How can 3 artificial satellites disappearing at one particular directional location. Yes I tried searching on Heaven-above.com but didn't find anything interesting. $\endgroup$ – Dixita Oct 8 '20 at 17:42
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    $\begingroup$ @Dixita there is a high concentration of satellites in low Earth orbit at around 400 to 700 km in altitude. During this period of time Earth's shadow doesn't move move that much, so what these events have in common is that they show you where the shadow begins. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 9 '20 at 8:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Dixita actually thinking more about it, if one is looking towards the shadow in roughly the eastly direction, the Sun is behind the viewer and even if satellites are at different altitudes they may disappear at roughly the same place; one is looking roughly parallel to the light/dark shadow's edge. i.stack.imgur.com/f2utm.png If you included more information on the geographic location and time and date and which direction you were looking, it might be possible identify exactly which satellites these were. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 9 '20 at 13:21
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh You seem to have the makings of a better answer! :) $\endgroup$ – Mike G Oct 9 '20 at 14:16
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeG your answer is complete and correct; I just addressed the OP's follow-up request for clarification. Please feel free to incorporate anything there back into your answer; comments are considered temporary, but I won't have a chance to post a separate answer. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 9 '20 at 15:02
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That can be Draconids meteor shower. It's peak date was 8 October.

So, there are quite great chances that you saw some of the meteors from Draconids.

Also, meteors from showers can appear from anywhere, and go anywhere: they can go from high to low altitudes or even low to high.

You also mentioned about color. As the meteors enter the atmosphere and burn up, according to the temperature they can produce different colors.

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